bob dylan tour – How Bob Went From Zimmerman To Dylan

He never really cared for commercial success: maybe he didn’t really shun it, but he always made clear that his primary aim in this world was not making money or screwing chicks, and success never really got to his head.

bob dylan tour – Bob Dylan Music, Videos, Stats, And Photos

BOB DYLANIn an alchemic mix of fact and fantasy, Martin Scorsese looks back at Bob Dylan‘s 1975 Rolling Thunder Revue tour and a country ripe for reinvention. Yet, to be perfectly honest, I don’t feel that everything on the electric set is up to the same standard. I don’t feel that a lot of work has really gone into the rearrangements of old classics; ‘I Don’t Believe You’ threatens to fall apart and sink each time the bridge comes along, and ‘One Too Many Mornings’ is really way too intimate a tune to be read that way. I do say that Bob would become much more versatile in thinking of creative rearrangements in the future, but here he’s way too concentrated on fucking with the audience to give it a real think. And the rest, too, is hit and miss: for every terrific garage cut like ‘Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat’ you get yourself something botched. ‘Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues’, for instance, was the perfect lazy song on the perfect lazy day; trying to get it to kick ass is like trying to make a wild boogie dance out of the Kinks’ ‘Sunny Afternoon’.

Tom was a jazz guy, produced a lot of jazz records, mostly Sun Ra. I just turned around one day and he was there. Nowadays they’d call him a producer, but back then they didn’t call him that; he was a typical A&R man, responsible for your repertoire. I didn’t exactly need a repertoire because I had songs of my own, so I didn’t know what an A&R man did. Somebody had to be there from the record company to communicate with the engineer. Back then I don’t think I was ever allowed to talk to an engineer. The board was simple – two, at the most four, tracks. In those early years you went into the studio and recorded live, take after take. If someone made a mistake you had to start over, or you just had to work your way through a song until you got the right version. Nobody at the major recording studios was doing Brian Wilson and Phil Spector type records, bouncing tracks around, freeing up other tracks.

A groundbreaking singer-songwriter, activist and poet, Bob Dylan has been a major pop culture figure for half a century. Along with countless other awards, Dylan has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 10 Grammy Awards, the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature. This summer, he released a special box set from his Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour.

The really bad news is that this time around he decided to team up with the novelist Jacques Levy, who eventually wrote half of the lyrics on here, however strange that might seem – you’d think Dylan could be in need of any possible help in the studio but that of a lyricist, really. Count it as another one in an endless series of unpredictable Zimmerman stunts. Thus, ladies and gentlemen, for the first time since 1964 we see Bob singing straightforward anti-establishment social protest songs like ‘Hurricane’ (about the unjustly jailed middleweight black champion Rubin Carter) and ‘Joey’ (about the unjustly done in generous gangster Joey Gallo). The lyrics on these ones range from so-so to extremely dumb, which is no mean feat, especially considering that ‘Hurricane’ is 8 minutes long and ‘Joey’ is 11 minutes long. Those who are not used to having your Dylan so straight in your face can even be shocked.

Pretty good actually – the Duke, I met him on a battleship in Hawaii where he was filming a movie, he and Burgess Meredith. One of my former girlfriends was in the movie too, and she told me to come over there; she introduced me to him and he asked me to play some folk songs. I played him Buffalo Skinners,” Raggle Taggle Gypsy,” and I think I’m a Rambler, I’m a Gambler.” He told me if I wanted to I could stick around and be in the movie. He was friendly to me.

My voice cracking here and there wouldn’t bother me, bum notes or wrong chords would bother me more. On September of My Years,” I didn’t fix anything. That would be impossible to pull off anyway because we were all in the same room playing together at the same time and there was a lot of leakage into other mics. You only fix things if you overdub the vocals separately and we didn’t do that here. If you mangle a lyric on records like this, you have to go back and start over. It’s a live recording. My voice cracking here or there just might mean it was recorded too early in the day, but it doesn’t hurt the overall effect, it wouldn’t bother me.


Female backing vocals are also featured strongly throughout the record, and, unlike so many people, I really don’t think they’re out of place. Even if EmmyLou Harris’s voice is sometimes more audible than Dylan’s (especially on the slow, pompous, solemn ‘Oh Sister’), it is quite pleasant and strong, and it never sounds generic enough to permit us to dismiss it as an obligatory R’n’B element.

From 1970 till now there’s been about 50 years, seems more like 50 million. That was a wall of time that separates the old from the new and a lot can get lost in this kind of time. Entire industries go, lifestyles change, corporations kill towns, new laws replace old ones, group interests triumph over individual ones, poor people themselves have become a commodity. Musical influences too – they get swallowed up, get absorbed into newer things or they fall by the wayside. I don’t think you need to feel bummed out though, or that it’s out of your clutches – you can still find what you’re looking for if you follow the trail back. It could be right there where you left it – anything is possible. Trouble is, you can’t bring it back with you, you have to stay right there with it. I think that is what nostalgia is all about.

No, I don’t think so. I think it’s a sincere romantic ballad. Smoke getting in my nose could be metaphorical, but it’s also very real at face value. There are a lot of lines like that in blues and folk music, My bucket’s got a hole in it,” there are stones in my passway,” my motor don’t turn,” there’s a ring in my tub,” there’s smoke in my nose.” It’s not unlike a Blind Lemon line, it’s been a meatless and wheatless day.” Sure, it’s a romantic ballad, but I don’t think it can be dismissed that easily. A fire in the fireplace could burn your place down.



Old-time Dylan fans soured by his previous lackluster live shows over the decades might hesitate to return to see him, convinced that his career is solidly dead. (Rumors perennially surface that he is indeed dead; even Siri reported that as recently as September.) But that would be too bad. He’s great again, and his approach to his music is as urgent and alive as ever.

From the beginning of his career, Dylan’s voice has garnered him jeers and praise. And as time has passed, some older fans gripe that he’s just croaking out songs. But that’s absurd. His voice, now gravelly, has grown richer. He’s aged beyond youthful nasality and mumbling and embodied the vocal characteristics of the cigarette- and whiskey-ravaged old bluesmen he has spent so much of his life honoring. Now, he is one.

The bottomline is that when it comes to Live 1966, everybody’s talking about the conflict and confrontation, but few people are talking about the music. Which is understandable – and then let us also not forget that perhaps Live 1966 is intended to be assimilated as an ‘event’, a ‘happening’, maybe a ‘psychological revolution’ if you wanna go that far, and for that impact alone it deserves a major boost along the rating lines. And that’s fine by me, because in that respect it awes me as much as anybody. However, calling it ‘the best live album ever’, as some have done, would be like, I dunno, calling Jackson Pollack the best artist who ever lived. Hey, I’m not saying that’s necessarily false, mind you – I’m just saying it’s necessarily weird. And sure I’ve been running this site for eight years now, but for some reason that hasn’t been enough to make me appropriately weird myself. Not yet.

The Bob Dylan Archive® highlights the unique artistry and worldwide cultural significance of Bob Dylan. Housed at the University of Tulsa’s Helmerich Center for American Research at Gilcrease Museum, the archive includes decades of never-before-seen handwritten manuscripts, notebooks and correspondence; films, videos, photographs and artwork; memorabilia; personal documents; unrecorded song lyrics and chords.

Again, as in the case of Selfportrait, I ain’t saying this album is particularly great or something. But to the average Dylan fan who loathes this I repeat it once again: don’t judge Mr Zimmerman by your expectations of what – in your mind – Mr Zimmerman should actually be doing. Mr Zimmerman has always reserved the right to be unpredictable, and I applaud him for that. Rather judge this record by the very quality of the tunes and the level of performance. The tunes are great, the performance is tight and professional; if you want a particularly Sincere, Authentic and Convincing Muse floating around, go back to Live 1966 or some other place like that. I can happily be satisfied with this, as I’m just busy digging the exciting untrivial arrangements.

At the peak of his career Bob eventually got into a motorcycle crash and subsequently dropped into a coma and out of the cultural and musical life of the Summer of Love. One can only wonder what album would have followed Blonde were it not so, and what would be Bob’s part in all the movements of 1967. Instead, after the convalescence he locked himself up in New York, in the so-called ‘basement of Big Pink’ (or ‘Big Punk’, as I call it) together with The Band and started recording bunches of weird songs. The tapes were bootlegged for a long time, until in 1975 they were released officially. However, since all of the recorded material dates back to 1967, this is where it belongs in my chronology.

Third and last, the songs themselves are good. Of course, you’ve heard all of these melodies before (‘Can’t Wait’ – typical Dylan ballad; ‘Dirt Road Blues’ – typical fast blues tune; others, too, it’s easy to find their ancestry), but this time I wouldn’t call any of them ‘recycled waste’. This is mostly blues tunes he’d never done before in that way. Sad, depressed blues tunes. Not gospel, or disco, or anything. Just sad, depressed blues tunes destined to reflect an old man’s reminiscences of his past and thoughts of his future.

Bob Dylan (born Robert Zimmerman May 24, 1941), is an American singer-songwriter, writer, and artist who has influenced popular music and culture for more than five decades. Dylan has especially played a critical role in the American folk music revival.

On July 29, 1966, Dylan was severely injured in a motorcycle accident. After this he took a break and didn’t release another album until John Wesley Harding in 1967. This album was a change from the harder edged electric sound of his hugely successful albums of 1965 and 1966. It was a shift to a more easy going country sound. He released four more albums in this form and then moved from Columbia Records to the smaller Asylum Records in 1973. While with Asylum, Dylan released his first number one album, Planet Waves , and a live album from the accompanying tour called Before the Flood Dylan returned to Columbia Records and followed up the commercial success of his last album with Blood on the Tracks , which critics applauded as a return to form after a period in which they viewed Dylan as being on the decline. He followed Blood on the Tracks up with Desire in 1976 and Street-Legal in 1978.

For me, the only possible letdown is the closing ‘Sara’, which I cannot accuse of having an original melody or anything like that. It’s kinda strange, because, as you understand, it’s a really broken-hearted ode to his ex-wife, where Bob confesses of still loving and caring for her and even admitting that it was for her that he wrote ‘Sad-Eyed Lady Of The Lowlands’, but most of the time it fails to move me. Maybe it’s because I’m just getting tired towards the end (after all, this album is 53 minutes long!), but, in my opinion, Bob could rarely choose a decent album closer. At least, not in the seventies. Then again, dammit, maybe I’m just seeing things and the song is just as good as any other one. After all, if I’m sometimes even moved by the eleven-minute ‘Joey’ (yeah, the bastard really makes me shed a tear for that gangster – all hail the power of music), I should be moved by ‘Sara’. Maybe you will.

Track listing: 1) Changing Of The Guards; 2) New Pony; 3) No Time To Think; 4) Baby Stop Crying; 5) Is Your Love In Vain; 6) Senor (Tales Of Yankee Power); 7) True Love Tends To Forget; 8) We Better Talk This Over; 9) Where Are You Tonight (Journey Through Dark Heat).

Following his graduation in 1959, he began studying art at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. While at college, he began performing folk songs at coffeehouses under the name Bob Dylan, taking his last name from the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas.

In 1960, Dylan dropped out of college and moved to New York, where his idol, the legendary folk singer Woody Guthrie , was hospitalized with a rare hereditary disease of the nervous system. He visited with Guthrie regularly in his hospital room; became a regular in the folk clubs and coffeehouses of Greenwich Village; met a host of other musicians; and began writing songs at an astonishing pace, including “Song to Woody,” a tribute to his ailing hero.

Early in 1978, Dylan set out on another extensive tour, this time backed by a band that resembled a Las Vegas lounge act. The group was featured on the 1978 album Street Legal and the 1979 live album At Budokan. At the conclusion of the tour in late 1978, Dylan announced that he was a born-again Christian, and he launched a series of Christian albums that following summer with Slow Train Coming. Though the reviews were mixed, the album was a success, peaking at number three and going platinum. His supporting tour for Slow Train Coming featured only his new religious material, much to the bafflement of his long-term fans. Two other religious albums – Saved (1980) and Shot of Love (1981) – followed, both to poor reviews. In 1982, Dylan traveled to Israel, sparking rumors that his conversion to Christianity was short-lived. He returned to secular recording with 1983’s Infidels, which was greeted with favorable reviews.

Yet, to be perfectly honest, I don’t feel that everything on the electric set is up to the same standard. I don’t feel that a lot of work has really gone into the rearrangements of old classics; ‘I Don’t Believe You’ threatens to fall apart and sink each time the bridge comes along, and ‘One Too Many Mornings’ is really way too intimate a tune to be read that way. I do say that Bob would become much more versatile in thinking of creative rearrangements in the future, but here he’s way too concentrated on fucking with the audience to give it a real think. And the rest, too, is hit and miss: for every terrific garage cut like ‘Leopard-Skin Pill-Box Hat’ you get yourself something botched. ‘Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues’, for instance, was the perfect lazy song on the perfect lazy day; trying to get it to kick ass is like trying to make a wild boogie dance out of the Kinks’ ‘Sunny Afternoon’.

PS. And did you actually know that the name of the gal on the album cover was Suze Rotolo? Oh, so you did. Betcha didn’t know she was Bob’s girlfriend at the time. Knew that, too? Okay then, here’s one thing you wouldn’t know for sure: BOB’S FLY IS LEFT HALF-UNZIPPED. Now that one is surely enough to make you drop out of your jet plane without a parachute.BOB DYLAN

A groundbreaking singer-songwriter, activist and poet, Bob Dylan has been a major pop culture figure for half a century. Along with countless other awards, Dylan has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, 10 Grammy Awards, the 2008 Pulitzer Prize and the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature. This summer, he released a special box set from his Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour.

Later that same night, the Mavericks played a two-and-a-half-hour show at the Ryman Auditorium. Only two of the original members (lead singer Raul Malo and drummer Paul Deakin) remain, but they are now joined by longtime keyboardist Jerry Dale McFadden and relatively new guitarist Eddie Perez as well as five auxiliary musicians. At the Mother Church of Country Music,” this nonet had a big-band sound, thanks to three jazz-schooled horn players and Tex-Mex accordion virtuoso Michael Guerra (who also played in the Doug Sahm tribute).

While his romantic relationship with Baez lasted only two years, it benefited both performers immensely in terms of their music careers—Dylan wrote some of Baez’s best-known material, and Baez introduced him to thousands of fans through her concerts. By 1964 Dylan was playing 200 concerts annually, but had become tired of his role as “the” folk singer-songwriter of the protest movement. Another Side of Bob Dylan, recorded in 1964, was a much more personal, introspective collection of songs, far less politically charged than Dylan’s previous efforts.

CD III: 1) Caribbean Wind; 2) Up To Me; 3) Baby I’m In The Mood For You; 4) I Wanna Be Your Lover; 5) I Want You; 6) Heart Of Mine; 7) On A Night Like This; 8) Just Like A Woman; 9) Romance In Durango; 10) Senor (Tales Of Yankee Power); 11) Gotta Serve Somebody; 12) I Believe In You; 13) Time Passes Slowly; 14) I Shall Be Released; 15) Knockin’ On Heaven’s Door; 16) All Along The Watchtower; 17) Solid Rock; 18) Forever Young.

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