brooklyn movie theatres near me – Motherless Brooklyn Movie Tickets And Showtimes

As they slowly file into the dining room to get their meals, unshaken and unkempt, they look like a sad and lonely bunch. She even captivated me as the most human teenage vampire in movie history in Neil Jordan’s chilling Byzantium.

brooklyn movie theater with couches – Edward Norton’s Richly Layered Film Noir Has One Major Flaw — Edward Norton

brooklyn movieAt least once a year, a film comes along in theaters that goes generally unheralded by mass marketing and nearly escapes without wide audience notice. Motherless Brooklyn is a film noir masterpiece, full stop. Nobody makes movies like these anymore, at least not a version as pure and accurate as Edward Norton’s script and direction allow. Every piece of this story resonates in authenticity; from Amy Roth’s costume design to the lush production design of Beth Mickle, the look and feel of ’50s New York shines through, with cinematographer Dick Pope’s eye for detail drinking in every frame for posterity.

But, no. In any era, there are the traps of falling into cliche or reductivism. If you think of the 1989 Jim Sheridan film My Left Foot, it’s about a poet with a literally crippling disability, but what’s wonderful about that film and about Daniel Day-Lewis’s performance as Irish poet Christy Brown is that it does the exact opposite of putting him on some saintly pedestal. It makes him fully human, including the fact that he could be a real son-of-a-bitch sometimes. He could have a real mean streak. The film doesn’t deny him his total humanity, and as a result, it’s a really great story. Because of his insistence on doing his work and on not being viewed through the prism of his disability. I think the greatest respect you can give any character is complexity.

Perhaps, like all good actors, Norton wanted to give himself a challenge, and playing a character with Tourette’s sounded like a good one. But, for reasons that become obvious within a minute, at most, there’s a big difference between presenting this kind of protagonist in a book and presenting him onscreen.

The number 42 refers to the number on Jackie Robinson’s MLB jersey, and the film chronicles his ambitious quest for greatness as a baseball player amidst rampant racism in the 1940s. The movie revolves around the 1947 baseball season of the Brooklyn Dodgers and includes many scenes in their namesake borough.


Join us for the 20th Anniversary of Movies With A View! Since its launch in 2000, we’ve wowed, entertained, thrilled, and pulled at the heartstrings of over 500,000 moviegoers, making our program a summer must and one of New York City’s favorite film series. Movies With A View takes place every Thursday evening in July and August on Pier 1’s Harbor View Lawn. There is no better place to be on a hot summer night than watching a classic film and enjoying the breeze off of the East River with the dazzling Manhattan skyline before you. This year’s theme is “Better the Second Time Around” and will feature popular films shown over the series’ history.

Set against the backdrop of 1950s New York, “Motherless Brooklyn” follows Lionel Essrog (Edward Norton), a lonely private detective living with Tourette Syndrome, as he ventures to solve the murder of his mentor and only friend, Frank Minna (Bruce Willis). Armed only with a few clues and the engine of his obsessive mind, Lionel unravels closely-guarded secrets that hold the fate of the whole city in the balance. In a mystery that carries him from gin-soaked jazz clubs in Harlem to the hard-edged slums of Brooklyn and, finally, into the gilded halls of New York’s power brokers, Lionel contends with thugs, corruption and the most dangerous man in the city to honor his friend and save the woman who might be his own salvation.

Maybe I’m going crazy, but I appear to be on booktour again. Yes, that’s it for sure. Tonight I’ll be at Barbara’s Bookstore in Chicago, where like a Jumbo Pacific Shrimp I’ll be popped out of my generic shell of lodging comfort and travel discomfort, my bubble of Simpsons reruns and Cinnabuns, into the agreeably humble and sweet lap of local reality. Me and a bunch of booksellers and readers will resume our nightly love affair, which is delicate, and improvised, sometimes clumsy and always hugely real. It’s also never the same twice. That’s what’s so remarkable about booktouring: the rapid, almost strobe-like alternation between an infinity of repetitions and the impossibly unrepeatable.

Nicholas Roeg’s The Man Who Fell to Earth is based on a scrappy little science fiction novel by Walter Tevis. The same guy who wrote the source material for The Hustler, the Paul Newman billiards movie. What a great thing to be Walter Tevis and have such two bizarrely different kinds of movies based on your novels. And I doubt many people even think of Walter Tevis in connection to those movies.

So I wasn’t completely shocked that something happened with Motherless Brooklyn. It was optioned by New Line for Edward Norton before it was even published — it was in galleys. I could feel that book was on a special fast track, from the kinds of pre-publication reviews it was getting. And indeed, it was a kind of breakout for me. I had been a happy little cult author, I didn’t have any complaints. But Motherless Brooklyn landed with a bit more noise and fizz and energy than I’d experienced before.

Lionel’s disorder makes him an unlikely hero since his bodily tics and bizarre and uncontrollable vocal utterances keep him at a distance from polite society, where he’s either shunned or embarrassed (his nickname is Freakshow). He’s comfortable working in the shadows for his boss and sponsor Frank Minna (Willis, solid in what amounts to little more than a cameo), the owner of the detective agency who plucked Lionel from an orphanage at the age of 12 and was kind and groomed him for the job because of the boy’s peerless memory. During the film’s opening sequence, a voiceover by Lionel familiarizes us with the character’s peculiarities, while the action concludes with Frank’s murder, a mysterious event that kicks into motion Lionel’s quest for answers. His fractious brain won’t rest until he puts the puzzle’s pieces together.

A gently sloping hillside provides the perfect setting for outdoor movies in Brooklyn Bridge Park, easily the borough’s most dramatic green space. The views of Lower Manhattan’s famed skyline often compete for viewers’ attention with a lineup featuring recent (Selma) and classic (It Happened One Night) films.

Many of the award-winning films from the Brooklyn Film Festival have gone on to have theatrical releases, to have nationwide broadcasts on PBS and HBO, and to be nominated and awarded at both the British and the American Academy Awards.

I think Thom Yorke is one of the very best writers in modern music, in terms of capturing both longing sensations in the heart (melancholy), but then also in his music, really capturing the fracture and the darkness and the dissonance of living in times that feel overwhelming or oppressive and stuff. I just liked the idea that his voice was sort of Lionel’s voice. Like, I got this notion in my head that Lionel, with this dissonant brain that he has, I thought: Thom just expresses a lot of what I think is going on in Lionel. And instead of using some clichéd needle drop of, like, a Billie Holiday song in a jazz film to express melancholy, I thought: We should try something new. We should write our own standard. We should write a melancholy ballad that’s unique to Lionel.

Brooklyn ,” a lovely film based on the even lovelier novel by Colm Toibin, feels like an answer to that question. Set in its titular borough and in a small Irish town in the early 1950s, it is both sharply observed and gently nostalgic.brooklyn movie

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That’s the wonderful thing about Brooklyn: it doesn’t resign itself to one kind of story. One of the true joys of watching this film is remarking on how much of yourself you see in it, and specifically in the character of Eilis. She’s not perfect by any stretch of the imagination, but she’s obscenely easy to root for anyway. Her story is ours, even if it’s separated by decades and several thousands of miles. It’s an allegory, perhaps, but the one thing it isn’t is a fairy tale. There’s no inevitability, no moralizing, no prescribed path toward happiness. Which is to say it feels real. It feels like home.

And though Bruce Willis’ Frank is killed off very early in the story, he returns from time to time as a voice of conscience and reason in Lionel’s overcrowded head. We know Willis can do this kind of role in his sleep, but that doesn’t mean he’s not terrific.

When I was coming of age, like, a movie like “Reds” had a huge impact on me. Warren Beatty wrote, produced, directed and starred in a three-hour-and-15-minute film about American socialists, with documentary interviews with the real people from the time.

The festival is for and by independent filmmakers. The organizers of BFF bring 22 years of festival experience to this annual event. BFF accepts submissions in six categories: Narrative Features, Documentary Features, Short Narrative, Short Documentary, Experimental, and Animation. Submissions are open from July to March of the following year. The final selection of 130+ films is announced in May, and the festival takes place in June. All the films that make up our final lineup come from submissions only. Each selected film plays twice at different venues. They are all eligible for several awards and the smallest film can win the top award: Grand Chameleon. In addition to our film programs, BFF also hosts multiple filmmaker parties and networking events at venues around Brooklyn and New York City.

Motherless Brooklyn, a crime, drama film noir throwback by Edward Norton, tells the story of a gumshoe detective with Tourettes Syndrome, a disorder characterized by involuntary tics, investigating the death of his boss, mentor and adoptive father figure, Frank Minnis, played by BruceMotherless Brooklyn, a crime, drama film noir throwback by Edward Norton, tells the story of a gumshoe detective with Tourettes Syndrome, a disorder characterized by involuntary tics, investigating the death of his boss, mentor and adoptive father figure, Frank Minnis, played by Bruce Willis. Edward Norton wrote, directed, starred and produced the film.

Edward Norton had his own ideas about the book. He was really clear. I’d already learned that the people who option your book are expecting you to be very protective of it. Preemptively I said, I’m not one of those writers. Do whatever you want.


The last time Edward Norton directed a movie, he tweaked his intense actor’s-actor image with Keeping The Faith , a thoughtful and sweetly old-fashioned romantic comedy that radiated love for New York City. Twenty years ago, this was a big studio release—and from Disney, no less. Now, at a time when Keeping The Faith might only exist as a Netflix Original, Norton has finally finished his long-gestating follow-up, an adaptation of Jonathan Lethem’s mystery novel Motherless Brooklyn (a book that was only months old when his last directorial project came out). Though it doesn’t much look or act like his previous movie, Motherless Brooklyn is plenty old-fashioned, too, and it professes its own love (however more complicated) for the actor’s adopted hometown.

The movie, Motherless Brooklyn”, written and directed and starring Ed Norton, with Bruce Willis, Alec Baldwin and Willem Defoe, was finishing up a shoot next door on Saint Nicholas Avenue when the fire broke out in the basement.


Imagine you’re a 24-year-old transgender filmmaker. This is not a time to lament. This is a time to celebrate. There is more chance for that voice to get to tell a story in some crazy form that defies the two-hour film expectation. It’s a very robust time. More people are being led into the tent of storytelling. There are more formats, more audiences reaching things in all kinds of ways. And maybe that pressure of the opening weekend box office won’t be appealing to people anymore. These things shift and change. To me, that’s not a tragedy.

Music plays an important role in setting the tone and establishing the period of Motherless Brooklyn.” The score is composed by Daniel Pemberton (Steve Jobs,” All The Money In The World,” Oceans 8,” Spider Man: Into The Spiderverse”) and features Wynton Marsalis on the trumpet. The film also features an original song written and performed by Thom Yorke.

Lionel (Norton) has Tourette’s like tics and outbursts, along with an obsessive mind for detail. He works for private eye Frank Minna ( Bruce Willis ) who enjoys throwing Lionel tangents because he knows Lionel will focus when he needs to. As the trailers revealed, Willis is pretty much a cameo in Motherless Brooklyn, so most of the movie is about Lionel figuring out what happened and why.

Q: Some of the themes of the film include racism, gentrification and power. Although the movie is set in the 1950s, the themes that were relevant 60 years ago are still applicable today. Motherless Brooklyn is a suspenseful mystery. The dialogue is crackling as Lionel penetrates a series of suspects at a brisk pace. No one is straight forward but everyone is true to their own character and motivations.

In the film, “Motherless Brooklyn” Edward Norton plays Lionel Essrog, a small-time detective thrown into some very big doings. Norton got a bit choked up when he relayed a story about a fire that broke out on set and resulted in the death of a New York City Firefighter who was called to the scene. He dedicated the screening to that engineman.

Unfortunately, Norton’s noir opus is a mixed bag of big ideas and generic themes, stifled by an even more generic presentation. Norton has taken Lethem’s detective novel and made it even more sprawling—adding several more characters and changing the setting to historic 1950s New York—but his chosen method to convey this new sprawl is through long-winded voice over and characters endlessly expositing at each other in over-lit rooms. There are seeds of interesting storylines, and plenty of ambition for sure, but Motherless Brooklyn is way too overstuffed and flat for that ambition to really be felt.

I thought one of the most astute observations he made, which is just clinically true, is that one of the things that makes it the most challenging is how tough it is to keep a film in theatres. He talks about how the churn of commercial films shooting for very large opening weekends – there are so many now, and they come at such a pace, that a film that is getting a terrific response from an adult audience but needs time for the word of mouth and for the audience to keep coming – that’s just not available anymore.

Miss Kelly, Eilis’s former employer, tells her that she knows through gossip that Eilis is married. Agitated, Eilis realizes what it was really like living in this small town. She tearfully informs her mother about her marriage and that she is returning to Brooklyn. On the ocean crossing, she offers guidance to a young woman making her own first trip to Brooklyn. The film ends with Eilis and Tony reuniting and happily embracing.

The director and screenwriter have been gifted with an extraordinary lead actor. In the role of Eilis, Saoirse Ronan is as alert, intelligent, and emotionally alive as the character herself. Ronan, herself a native of Ireland, has, in this movie, put on a very, if you’ll excuse the expression, Irish-girl face: open, clear-eyed, with a not-hard jawline that’s nonetheless set with a certain kind of determination. It’s the furthest thing from forbidding, but it also sends a clear message: she’ll brook no nonsense.

Join us for the 20th Anniversary of Movies With A View! Since its launch in 2000, we’ve wowed, entertained, thrilled, and pulled at the heartstrings of over 500,000 moviegoers, making our program a summer must and one of New York City’s favorite film series. Movies With A View takes place every Thursday evening in July and August on Pier 1’s Harbor View Lawn. There is no better place to be on a hot summer night than watching a classic film and enjoying the breeze off of the East River with the dazzling Manhattan skyline before you. This year’s theme is “Better the Second Time Around” and will feature popular films shown over the series’ history.

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