chief keef dead – Glory Boy (@ChiefKeef) On Twitter

During the one-on-one, the Chicago rapper spoke on his highly-anticipated track with Uzi. People all over the country, not just Chicago, came to love his music. Footage of police detaining the rapper was broadcast by KNBC-TV Channel 4.

chief keef age when love sosa – Chief Keef Tour Dates 2019 & Concert Tickets

CHIEF KEEFEarlier this year, Chief Keef teased a collab with Lil Uzi Vert that has yet to be released. Yet it was not just those artists driven to emulation who benefitted from his immense center of gravity. He’d become a common denominator for whom new artists could market themselves in the contrast, who would find success in a marketplace which would rewarded them for being an anti-Keef. Chance the Rapper offered an optimistic vision for those eager for a young Chicago artist whose worldview didn’t seem quite so bleak. Rae Sremmurd‘s youthful cheeriness offered a parent-approved pose Keef refused to perform. The Migos’ typewriter-like precision flows, which emerged one year later, were seen as a lyrical” contrast by fans resistant to the newly dominant style of slurred mumbling. Young Thug’s elaborate melodic architecture and unconventional personal style was an eccentric, stylized parallel thread more beloved by critics, torn over Keef’s traditionally macho approach.


Cozart has faced ongoing legal issues during his career, including weapon possession charges, house arrest sentences, and a performance ban imposed by the Chicago authorities. Despite being dropped from Interscope in late 2014 and later signing to 1017 Records, Keef continued self-releasing projects through his own Glo Gang label, including Nobody, Back from the Dead 2, Bang 3, and Thot Breaker.

But I’d contend that over the past six years, since Chief Keef first emerged, his impact has more directly defined the sound, shape, and tone of hip-hop writ large, than any other artist. (Kanye West — whose remix of Don’t Like” both propelled and obscured Keef’s original — remains a powerful artistic barometer, but his biggest aesthetic impacts predate Keef.) Keef’s emergence was a paradigm shift that marked the arrival of a new generation, a sea change in the music’s sound, in how it was covered, where it came from, and how the industry marketed their artists. It’s especially impressive because he’s done so from an obscured position, invisible in the broader musical discourse. And the bulk of this influence came not from his work in the mainstream spotlight of 2012, but in his work after — when the popular consensus was that his career was over, a misfire, the product of opportunistic media hype.

In this way, he pursued hip-hop’s possibilities not just at mere levels of lyrics or flow, but through the full breadth of song forms, and how these many forms create a range of effects. On the deliberate Go to Jail,” he slowed the tempo to a crawl, a choice which seemed to test the audience, to make them yearn for the melodic structure which gradually coheres beneath the weight of his crumbling vocal timbre. These melodic records toyed with notions of his own agency—what was him, and what was the drugs?—yet their increasing sophistication over time, their further harmonic and textural invention, suggested an artist in control of his creations. Other songs developed his voice as a rapper, relying on dizzying, disorienting production, Keef’s unpredictable phrasing forging its own rhythmic pocket. Even to characterize his work as solely the domain of ugly feelings” risks pigeonholing; some of his most popular underground hits were cheery trap anthems , another anomaly for the genre.

As biological organisms, we can mark time on this dying blue dot in celestial ways, scrutinizing the moons and stars overhead. As participants in capitalism, we can measure it in billing cycles, haircuts, oil changes or by the expiration dates printed on packages of string cheese. As rap listeners, we can measure time in Chief Keef albums.

Keef turns the phrase you know I got good dope” into an inescapable refrain on the song Old Heads and Regretful Hoes” off his recent collaborative record with the producer Zaytoven. The album has a lot of minor-key piano scraps, twitchy beats and detuned vocals. Many of Keef’s lines end with him holding the last syllable of the last word and slowly dropping the pitch, as if the vocal were falling off a cliff. One of Keef’s tricks is repeating a line quickly, over and over, until it becomes abstract: listen to What Can I Say” for an example of the approach.

We’ve been riding around in his convoy (a GMC Denali, a Mercedes truck, and an Escalade, which together carry about 15 people) all day, watching Keef get grilled on his sudden rise to fame, Kanye West remixing his song , and his extravagant deal with Interscope The label gave him his own imprint (making him the youngest major-label boss in history), his own Beats by Dr. Dre headphone line called Beats by Keef, and a biopic. In the back of the Escalade between interviews, where the carpet is covered in ash, Keef takes Instagram pictures of himself with his money.

Flashback to 2012: Keith Farrelle Cozart, a.k.a. Chief Keef, drops the infamous music video to his hit song I Don’t Like,” and for a moment, the world stands still — that’s how it felt in my high school, at least. Back then, it seemed as though everybody was listening to and talking about Chief Keef nonstop, not simply because he was controversial — he apparently shot the I Don’t Like” video while on house arrest — but because the music was great.

GloToven features a guest appearance from Lil Pump, who tapped Keef for a feature on Whitney” from his own self-titled studio debut in 2017. The release is notably credited to Keef’s own independent RBC imprint Glo Gang, rather than FilmOn, the label run by Greek billionaire Alki David, whose A&R skills have produced such oddities as The Cozart’s dance-rap abomination Soldier” In a press release, Zaytoven said collaborating with Keef stretched his limits. It’s one of my favorite albums because it challenges me to produce with youthful, unorthodox creativity,” he said.

All of this interest occurred during the 2013-2016 period in which mainstream press attention to Keef was at low ebb. And yet interest among his core fans — including many of the artists who would become the next generation of stars themselves — remained high. It’s not hard to hear Keef’s influence on each of them, the Bush or Silverchair to his Kurt Cobain. One needs to look only at the 2016 XXL Freshman Class , the cover story focusing on the new generation of hip-hop stars. Each seems borne from a single strand of Keef’s creative DNA, a reflection of a different side of his sound, residents of a world he created.

Keef’s on-and-off relationship with celebrity has often been at odds with what feels like growing troll-like music. He largely stays off the radar aside from releases, features, and tours. His music grows more arrogant and farther away from what we traditionally define as hip-hop. It may read as a beckon for public attention, but time and time again, he skirts away from it. His experimentation worked a tad bit better spread out across entire mixtapes; when an entire body of work is a set of trials, it’s a little harder to swallow.

Come May 2012, Chief Keef exploded into sudden fame. I Don’t Like” climbed to #15 on Billboard’s Hot Rap Songs chart, while the music video went viral with over 28 million views on YouTube. At a time when Kanye sat atop the throne, Drake was dictating hip-hop’s ever-shifting sound, and Kendrick was busy recording the most-anticipated rap debut since 50 Cent, Keef had become the hottest star. His rapid ascent was further solidified when Kanye created a remix of I Don’t Like” for GOOD Music’s forthcoming compilation album, followed by Drake praising Love Sosa” on Twitter three days after its October release.

And while all these other rappers were learning from his influence, Keef was at home in Los Angeles, continuing to crank out more music, most of it increasingly weird and gooey and personal. It hasn’t all been like that; Keef’s 2014 churning, gothic cult hit Faneto” is as immediate as anything he recorded when he still had his Interscope contract. But some of Keef’s more disorienting music has its own kind of force. Earlier this year, Keef released Thot Breaker, a deeply strange and fascinating mixtape. It’s all miasmic haze, Keef crooning soft melodies through so much Auto-Tune that only a trace of his humanity remains. Keef sings a lot about sex on Thot Breaker, but he sings about love, too, and he does it sincerely: Do you wanna hold haaaands?” It’s warped, gooey music, light years removed from the martial anthems that Keef came up making. But it’s nearly as powerful, and Thot Breaker has kept me coming back all year.

So on Halloween night — a time-honored bonbon pillage rooted in ancient Celtic new year’s festivities — the hyper-prolific Chicago rapper slid into the Fillmore Silver Spring to celebrate Back From the Dead 3 ,” a murky, claustrophobic new album he had released just hours earlier. Maybe celebrate” is the wrong word. There were no balloon drops, no confetti plumes, no costumes, nothing like that — probably because Back From the Dead 3” is the eighth album Keef has dropped this year.

For proof, look to the stage where Keef’s express lack of dynamism — in tone, lyricism, mood and mien — made even his slightest shifts in delivery feel like wild swerves. On Planet Keef, the melodic smirks of Call’n” became operatic, the smug self-congrats of Earned It” felt euphoric, the sneaker-stomp of Faneto” was a stampede.

The Cozart is Keef’s latest, and his most experimental to date. It feels like a high-art project from Tru TV’s Impractical Jokers, the mixtape being a prop used to embarrass one of the four comedians with its weirdness. Across 17 tracks, Keef raps, sings, brings in other people to sing, and mumbles in increasingly off-kilter ways. “Soldier” is perhaps the biggest offender of traditional Keef fandom. Never before has Keef stepped in the direct opposite direction of contemporary rap. Largely clear of bass, “Soldier” incorporates a tantalizing techno structure underneath its gaudy grooveline. Keef bounces like never before, an element of goofiness making its way into his latest. The track has garnered its fair share of laughs and ridicule, but it’s indicative of one of the more flexible artists in the contemporary rap landscape.

In May, footage obtained by TMZ appears to show Tekashi alluding to having a got a 30 pack” on Tadoe, Chief’s cousin after exchanging heated words on Facetime. The slang references a $30,000 murder contract taken out on an enemy.

Keef is still messy. He’s getting arrested for dumb reasons — weed at an airport, robbing a producer. But his music continues to quietly branch out in all these different directions, and the power of what he was doing six years ago continues to help shape the new rap music that we’re hearing. Keef is still young. He’s just 22, which means he’s been famous for more than a quarter of his life. He could still go on to do great things. But if he keeps cranking out another few mixtapes of fascinating, inscrutable rap music a couple of times a year, that’s fine, too.

Keith Cozart, professionally known as Chief Keef, is a rapper, producer and designer hailing from the Southside of Chicago. At the ripe age of 16 Keef’s music videos for I Don’t Like” and Love Sosa” were met worldwide acclaim putting him at the at the forefront of Chicago’s hip hop subgenre of drill music. The popularity of these videos quickly led to him being signed to a major record deal with Interscope Records making him the youngest artist at that time to ever be signed to the label. After his time at Interscope Keef started his own record label, Glory Boyz Entertainment.

Born Keith Cozart, he has gained a large fan base with his mixtapes and his debut album, Finally Rich, which was released at the end of 2012. He is also the CEO of his own record label, Glory Boyz Entertainment, and he fronts the rap group Glo Gang.

The high school dropout was arrested on Jan. 27, 2011, and charged with manufacture and delivery of heroin near a school, public housing building or park, a Class X felony, according to police records. Juvenile offenders are determined to be “delinquent” rather than guilty of charges. Chief Keef served time on home confinement on the drug charge, according to reports.


Cozart’s music promotes violence and posed a significant public safety risk,” a spokeswoman for Mayor Emanual told the Chicago Tribune. New York rapper “Natty” Reynoso shares a moment with Keef before getting a photo. Upon walking away, she explains how meaningful it was to meet him.

The shooter did not strike 22-year-old Keef, whose legal name is Keith Cozart, but instead struck the signage. From his own mouth, states, Tekashi offered $20,000 for the Chief Keef hit. But when Tekashi tried to go cheap and reduce the price to $10,000 the job got bungled.

A police source said the incident may have been the result of a beef Keef is having with a Brooklyn rapper. Police on Saturday afternoon said they are still looking for two men in connection with the shooting- which became a source of ridicule from members of Keef’s rap group, Glo Gang.

One officer suffered bruises in the struggle to detain the rapper. Police recovered the pistol, which was loaded, according to reports. AD is a great snarling rap monster, and I was happy with him in that role. But when he spends a whole song in an effortless double-time, it’s a cool sign that there’s more to him.

The 24-year-old, real name Keith Farrelle Cozart, was shot at outside Times Square’s W Hotel, but he escaped unharmed. Keef, 22, whose given name is Keith Farrelle Cozart, told The Post he’s been feuding with 22-year-old Bushwick-born rival Tekashi 6ix9ine , whose given name is Daniel Hernandez.

Five years ago, ‘Finally Rich’ established the blueprint for a generation of Mumble rappers. Keef’s next project The Dedication” is set to be released Fall 2017, marking the third project he has released in 2017 thus far.

It’s just beef between me and the rapper 6ix9ine,” the Chicago-born rapper claimed. He is cousins with fellow Chicago rappers Fredo Santana and Tado. Keith Cozart, known as Chief Keef, arrives at court at the Minnehaha County Courthouse in SIoux Falls on April 26, 2019, on a drug charge from 2017.

Chief Keef also admitted the two have multiple songs in the stash. He truly became a superstar when Love Sosa” was released. People all over the country, not just Chicago, came to love his music. CHICAGO — Before Chief Keef got a shot at hitting it big in the rap game, the Englewood teen star was the target of shots — bullets fired at him by police — that missed, Chicago has learned.

Chief Keef can’t go back to Chicago. The rapper has outstanding warrants in his hometown, but the authorities in Chicago have enmities against Keef that go deeper than that. Back when he still lived in Chicago, before he relocated to Los Angeles, Keef was effectively banned from performing in his own town; I’ve got friends in Chicago who have told me about all the shows that were shut down before they had a chance to take place. Two years ago, Keef wanted to do a stop-the-violence benefit show, and he was going to perform live via hologram , beaming in his likeness from Los Angeles. And even that wasn’t allowed to happen. Chicago mayor Rahm Emanual put out a statement decrying Keef And when Keef tried to move the show to the neighboring city of Hammond, Indiana, his performance was famously shut down by police one song in. If police could’ve arrested the hologram, they probably would’ve done it.

Despite promises from the promoters that Chief Keef would not be appearing, the hologram took the stage around 10:30 p.m. Hammond police shut down the show about a minute later, Mayor McDermott said. There were no arrests, citations or incidents as more than 2,000 fans were cleared from the park.

But I’d contend that over the past six years, since Chief Keef first emerged, his impact has more directly defined the sound, shape, and tone of hip-hop writ large, than any other artist. (Kanye West — whose remix of Don’t Like” both propelled and obscured Keef’s original — remains a powerful artistic barometer, but his biggest aesthetic impacts predate Keef.) Keef’s emergence was a paradigm shift that marked the arrival of a new generation, a sea change in the music’s sound, in how it was covered, where it came from, and how the industry marketed their artists. It’s especially impressive because he’s done so from an obscured position, invisible in the broader musical discourse. And the bulk of this influence came not from his work in the mainstream spotlight of 2012, but in his work after — when the popular consensus was that his career was over, a misfire, the product of opportunistic media hype.

My introduction to Chief Keef came by way of WorldStarHipHop. Back in 2012, WorldStar was the go-to place to watch videos of drunk people fighting or unknown rappers freestyling, among other things, so, in a sense, it was a combination of Twitter and Instagram, before the two social media platforms grabbed a stranglehold on the mindless video” market.

Keef turns the phrase you know I got good dope” into an inescapable refrain on the song Old Heads and Regretful Hoes” off his recent collaborative record with the producer Zaytoven. The album has a lot of minor-key piano scraps, twitchy beats and detuned vocals. Many of Keef’s lines end with him holding the last syllable of the last word and slowly dropping the pitch, as if the vocal were falling off a cliff. One of Keef’s tricks is repeating a line quickly, over and over, until it becomes abstract: listen to What Can I Say” for an example of the approach.

Keef’s breakthrough single, Don’t Like,” was often described as nihilistic.” Nihilism came to stand in for everything: his music, his attitude, his person, his politics. It suggested he lacked an ideology, a belief system, or agency. He was a product of forces outside himself; his importance was a weightless, symbolic kind, a canary in the coalmine of the system’s moral rot. This isn’t entirely an accident; Keef’s attitude on Don’t Like” purposefully creates a chasmic distance between listener and artist. Even as he utilized populist tools (catchiness, bluntly direct lyrics), this attitude keeps listeners at a remove, in parallel with how his art received arm’s-length treatment in certain spaces. Yet crediting nihilism” for this distancing feels imprecise. Say what you will about them, but interest in authentic merchandise, affirmation of a familiar criminal code, and the ever-present armor of violence — a trope of street rap since N.W.A. — are not nihilistic values.

We’ve been riding around in his convoy (a GMC Denali, a Mercedes truck, and an Escalade, which together carry about 15 people) all day, watching Keef get grilled on his sudden rise to fame, Kanye West remixing his song , and his extravagant deal with Interscope The label gave him his own imprint (making him the youngest major-label boss in history), his own Beats by Dr. Dre headphone line called Beats by Keef, and a biopic. In the back of the Escalade between interviews, where the carpet is covered in ash, Keef takes Instagram pictures of himself with his money.

In 2015, two men were found fatally shot in a Compton marijuana dispensary that bore Chief Keef’s name. But the rapper’s manager denied that he had any formal ties to the dispensary, known as the Chief Keef Glo Shop.CHIEF KEEF


The rapper, who has a long history of run-ins with the law, had planned to perform via hologram as he is unable to appear in person in Chicago, where there is an outstanding warrant for his arrest on charges related to child support. On Monday, Keef encouraged his Twitter followers to call Emanuel and tell him to stay the f— off the people’s music,” providing them with a phone number to the city directory.

The Cozart is Keef’s boldest departure. That he began as one of modern drill’s founding fathers feels like it occurred a lifetime ago; he’s now on the fringe of modern rap relevancy, experimenting with structures with no end goal in mind. The running joke is that Keef’s high out of his mind, tinkering because the drugs are fucking up his creative process. But he was like this at the inception of his career; if anything, Keef’s creative vision has never been clearer. This is a guy who is 36 projects deep into his career at the tender age of 23 years old; somehow, he manages to keep up the pace when many others would have faltered or, at least, slowed down.

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