hustlers rotten tomatoes – David Dobrik Tries And Fails To Mime ‘Hustlers’ On Jimmy Fallon

And speaking of furs, the sheer amount of mink in this movie! Two months later, The New York Times reported about an indictment unsealed in State Supreme Court in Manhattan detailing the episode and more.

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HustlersHustlers” is stimulating, but for reasons that have little to do with stripping. Still, Barbash stressed the strip club scene Hustlers” depicted was completely different from the world she knew. The bond between strippers Ramona (Jennifer Lopez) and Destiny (Constance Wu) is the heart of Hustlers. While it’s refreshing to see a character like Destiny in Hollywood, the movie’s feel-good storyline is neither accurate nor empowering for the women who have lived these stories.Hustlers

Jennifer Lopez struts onto the main stage of a cavernous strip club in Hustlers” to the blaring tune of Fiona Apple’s late ‘90s anthem Criminal”—the first line of which, I’ve been a bad, bad girl,” suggests the knowing, playful tease to come.

Particularly surprising is the unquestioning attitude that Destiny’s grandmother shows towards the money that Destiny brings in. She does not shame Destiny, not the experience of many sex workers who fear telling their loved ones the truth about their financial situation.

Hustlers is an exception: The part is made to fit, and Lopez fills it better than any role she’s played since Out of Sight. She’s Ramona, the diva of her club — gorgeous and charismatic and volatile, a doting mother and the trashiest of big spenders, a warm mentor and (eventually) a ruthless criminal. Her personality dominates the movie, and the movie worships her in return.

Barbash, 47 — whose habit of drugging and robbing patrons inspired the movie — claims Lopez’s company Nuyorican Productions exploited” her likeness in the film without her permission, according to her Manhattan federal court defamation lawsuit filed Tuesday.

Yet the attempt to justify financial exploitation by the sexually exploited and blame the whole thing on Wall Street rings hollow. And the depiction of the two protagonists’ professional milieu is tasteless in its lack of restraint.


Frequent partial nudity including bare breasts and barely covered backsides. Extensive visual modeling of “sexy” behavior, including teaching techniques for pole and lap dancing. Women dance sensually, sometimes undressing each other as they perform for men. A scene shows how a character decides to engage in a sex act for money and feels degraded afterward. Sex toy shown on-screen. Women use their sexuality as bait. Full-frontal male nudity used for humor. References to prostitution.

The real-life inspiration for Jennifer Lopez’s character Ramona in Hustlers” insisted she despises the newfound attention she’s receiving after the hit film made over $33 million in its opening weekend. Never in my teenage stripping dreams would I have imagined that a story starring a complex Asian American sex worker would become a blockbuster feature film.

The idea is to show how women can do anything men can do, only better. Men in three-piece Brioni suits and neckties hustle their clients all day in the stock market, then after dark they breeze into the sex club depicted here to rip off the lap dancers. So the strip-club sisters devise a plan to turn the tables and rip off their male predators, which their gang leader Ramona (Lopez) insists is perfectly OK as long as nobody gets hurt. So the stage is set for a different kind of wallet-emptying embezzlement hustle that is dangerous, lucrative and illegal, but forget any notion that it breaks new ground.

Adapted from Jessica Pressler’s 2015 New York magazine article The Hustlers at Scores,” writer-director Lorene Scafaria’s movie tells the tale of two pole dancers, novice Destiny (Constance Wu) and veteran Ramona (Jennifer Lopez), who form a friendship. As they bond, Ramona instructs her newfound protege in the finer points of burlesque.

The new film, based on a true story, is a neon-soaked, incredibly fun meditation on female friendship. The movie was based on a 2015 New York Magazine article about the gang , but Barbash has said she declined to sell her rights to the movie’s producers, saying they offered her “peanuts”.


With Hustlers” being ostensibly the Avengers” and “Star Wars” of stripper movies, Scafaria juggles a large cast well and still keeps the momentum humming along. It’s a big shift from Scafaria’s last project, underrated heartwarmer The Meddler,” yet she balances the joyous fun with the larger moral questions at play. Even though the men (with a few exceptions) are mostly one-dimensional creeps, the women wrestle with the consequences of what they’re doing, with some feeling guilty and others sticking it to The Man, collectively speaking.

The entirety of Hustlers is contained in the way Destiny looks at Ramona. Later, Destiny goes up to the club’s roof, where Ramona is sitting and smoking, wrapped in an enormous fur, and the seasoned pro wraps up the inexperienced new girl in her coat, like she’s swaddling a baby or trying to swallow her new friend whole. This is the wonder of a close friendship between two women, in Scafaria’s view. As the movie progresses, Ramona will become Destiny’s best friend, her worst enemy, her sister, her confidante, and her mother. Sometimes, she will be all of those things in the same scene.

Lopez sparks off Wu, her onscreen partner in crime, and their close friendship (followed by the cracks that form within) grounds the movie. Other big names show up fleetingly, although they make the most of their time, including Cardi B as the club’s resident lap-dance expert, Lizzo playing the flute and even Usher preening for a quick cameo.


Watch out Wall Street! Constance Wu (left), Jennifer Lopez (right), and a powerhouse ensemble cast are coming for your wallets in Hustlers. It’s alluded to in the film’s one-line synopsis, which describes the women as turning the tables on their Wall Street clients”.

3. They shot in a real Long Island strip club called Show Palace despite people having told her not to film in a real place. They had about 300 extras in there, so they also had a comfort consultant and a stripper consultant on hand.

Constance Wu and Jennifer Lopez in Hustlers. The bachelor cardiologist who’s the real-life victim behind the new Jennifer Lopez movie Hustlers” is telling his story for the first time — about being repeatedly drugged and swindled by a greedy pack of strippers.

Hustlers is based on Jessica Pressler’s December 2015 New York magazine article The Hustlers at Scores,” for which the journalist interviewed both Keo and the scheme’s other leader, Samantha Foxx (née Barbash; this story will refer to her as Barbash since that is the name she went by at the time and the name listed in court documents). The women recounted a deep friendship which turned to sisterhood which then turned dark.

That hustling began with stripping at a local club in Rockland County, where Keo grew up, around an hour and a half’s drive from New York City, before she moved on to bigger opportunities at Times Square’s Flash Dancers club and Larry Flynt’s Hustler Club. She met Barbash at Hustler. It was 2007 when the two started working together to make money from mostly Wall Street guys,” Barbash told Pressler. At this time, their work was legal, earning money in tips and gifts from their male clientele.

Variety reported Barbash’s attorney Bruno Gioffre sent STX, the production company behind Hustlers,” a letter earlier this month demanding it works out a deal to compensate his client within 10 days or face a lawsuit. In response, the outlet reported STX defended its rights to make movies about actual events.

Scafaria and cinematographer Todd Banhazl film Lopez in semi-silhouette in front of a massive wall of pink-purple polka-dotted light (in a touch I liked, a few of the bulbs are burnt out). She slides up and down the pole throughout her routine as if she’s discovered a gravity-defying cheat code in a video game, and as men throw money onto the stage in appreciation, the camera keeps cutting to Destiny watching in the audience, gradually closing in on her face, her expression caught somewhere between love, admiration, and envy.

The new crime caper, based on a true story about a group of strippers who start ripping off their rich clientele through a scheme involving drugs and credit card swipes, is enormous fun, starting with its very first scene. It’s a casually brilliant tracking shot tour of the strip club where Destiny ( Constance Wu ), as the new girl,” walks from the dancers’ dressing rooms out onto the floor where men lustily cheer and shower money on the women who work at the club.

Samantha Barbash claims in her suit, producers approached her to get her consent for the movie and she turned a thumbs down on them. Despite the rejection, the flick was produced with J Lo playing a character obviously based on her. We broke a story back in Sept. that Barbash was pissed that she received a lowball offer from producers.

Hustlers remains a fantastic film highlighted by great performances, an eye-opening story, and a lot of heart. Scafaria’s commentary shows her to be a filmmaker with strong affection for her cast, crew, and the tale they’re telling.

In a way that recalls Bo Jackson in his two-sport years, Lopez’s division of her time between music divahood and movie stardom has left her with a movie career whose highlights are more impressive than the whole. Her perfect turn in 1998’s Out of Sight, her run of bland but successful romantic comedies, the famous flop of Gigli, a few memorably weird (Cell) or trashy (U-Turn) early efforts — she’s done a lot of work, but her celebrity is almost always bigger than her parts.

Seven years prior Destiny is working at Moves, a strip club , to support her grandmother but is barely getting by. Mesmerized by Ramona’s performance and the money she earns, Destiny strikes up a conversation. Ramona agrees to take Destiny under her wing, and the two form a formidable team. Destiny enjoys newfound wealth and a deep friendship with Ramona. A year later, the financial crisis of 2007-2008 strikes, and both women find themselves out of a job and lose touch. During this period, Destiny becomes a struggling single parent who has a hard time finding a job.

Hustlers is the fictionalised story of Barbash and other women who drugged and swindled rich men at strip clubs. But one thing Barbash did approve in Hustlers” was Lopez’s pole dancing. Roselyn Keo and Constance Wu as Destiny, the character based on her.

In the political economy of the movie, sex-positive, empowered-stripper feminism depends on full employment and big financial profits. Take away the good times, and the pigs set the agenda instead: When Destiny returns to dancing in 2011, after having a baby and trying to find a job outside the strip club, she finds that the more desperate post-crash economic scene empowers men to have their way with strippers and replaces women who complain with trafficked Russian flesh.

Out of the many movies that came out in 2019, “Hustlers” was by far the best I have seen. The movie does what most movies TRY to do but fail, it was fun without being overtly sentimental, it was intelligent without being preachy, and overall the movie has great re-watch appeal. Some haters will dismiss this movie as trashy because of the spotlight placed on strippers, but pearl-clutch morals aside, the script is strongly written, and the cast is charming and essentially perfection via Jennifer Lopez’s portrayal of Ramona. If you haven’t seen the movie yet, it’s you that’s missing out.

Still, Barbash stressed the strip club scene Hustlers” depicted was completely different from the world she knew. The bond between strippers Ramona (Jennifer Lopez) and Destiny (Constance Wu) is the heart of Hustlers. While it’s refreshing to see a character like Destiny in Hollywood, the movie’s feel-good storyline is neither accurate nor empowering for the women who have lived these stories.

Hustlers ,” since opening on September 13 following a smash world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, has earned nearly $160 million worldwide, along with a wave of accolades for the film’s star, Jennifer Lopez In the film written and directed by Lorene Scafaria, Lopez plays a version of Samantha Barbash, a single mother from the Bronx whom Scafaria discovered in a 2015 New York Magazine feature about strippers.

Hustlers is an exception: The part is made to fit, and Lopez fills it better than any role she’s played since Out of Sight. She’s Ramona, the diva of her club — gorgeous and charismatic and volatile, a doting mother and the trashiest of big spenders, a warm mentor and (eventually) a ruthless criminal. Her personality dominates the movie, and the movie worships her in return.

Wu is so empathetic in these scenes, in fact, that sometimes Destiny’s moral clarity starts to look a little sugarcoated. She’s always the one emphasizing how she doesn’t want to hurt anyone, a stance that the movie only lightly interrogates, as when Ramona suggests bringing in some women with sketchier rap sheets to help their operation and Destiny replies that they shouldn’t associate with criminals when breaking the law. A more shaded and somehow also showier performance comes from Lopez, who has not always been well-served by her thriller and rom-coms roles. Here, however, she has a rangier opportunity, drawing upon her background in dance, her movie-star charisma, and her Out Of Sight grit. It’s easily one of her best performances.

This is an interesting film. It’s a morally gray movie that focuses on the ethical murkiness of the situation of women taking advantage of the type of men who take advantage of them. The movie doesn’t try to take a particular stand but just wants you to watch in fascination like a good true crime story. This also sort of has a heist-type feel to it. It’s also pretty funny at moments.

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