is there a peanut butter falcon book – Palm Desert 10 Cinemas

It has been termed a modern Mark Twain style adventure.” While the plot is similar to many other mismatched buddy films, reviewers have been especially impressed by the performances of the cast and the chemistry between them.

the peanut butter falcon review indonesia – What ‘The Peanut Butter Falcon’ Rookies Did Right

The Peanut Butter FalconWhen Zack Gottsagen first met Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz, he dreamt of becoming a movie star. Which is, yes, predictable. But I suspect almost nobody who sees The Peanut Butter Falcon” will mind much. Along with the cinematographer, Nigel Bluck, and the editors, Kevin Tent and Nathaniel Fuller, the directors achieve a relaxed and amiable vibe while moving the story forward with dispatch through picturesque Southern Atlantic land and seascapes.

LaBeouf’s character isn’t the film’s Huck Finn; that honor belongs to Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man who’s escaped the nursing home in Georgia where he lives. (This technically makes Tyler the movie’s Jim, though given his puckish immaturity, he’s closer in temperament to Tom Sawyer.) Zak is a thirtysomething with Down’s syndrome. He’s also a huge fan of pro wrestling, notably a colorful grappler known as the Saltwater Redneck. On the videotape that Zak forces his elderly roommate (Bruce Dern) to watch ad nauseam, the celebrity keeps pitching the wrestling school he runs in North Carolina. So the superfan releases himself of his own recognizance late one night, with the idea of enrolling in his hero’s academy for bodyslammers, and ends up meeting Tyler. The grungy gent is running from his own problems, hoping to make it to Florida before some angry fishermen catch up to him. But this fugitive figures he can help Zak achieve his dream first.

Written and directed by Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, Zack Gottsagen. At Coolidge Corner, Kendall Square, suburbs. 96 minutes. PG-13 (thematic content, language throughout, some violence, smoking).

The Peanut Butter Falcon is available to watch and stream, buy on demand at Google Play, iTunes online. The Peanut Butter Falcon is not showing in any theaters in the area. LaBeouf is scruffily compelling, while the pinpoint comic timing of Gottsagen should be a lesson to any drab corners of the film industry still resisting disabled actors.

Summary: Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, runs away from a residential nursing home to follow his dream of attending the professional wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). A strange turn of events pairs him on the road with Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a small time outlaw on the run, who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find God, catch fish, and convince Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), a kind nursing home employee charged with Zak’s return, to join them on their journey.

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON tells the story of Zak (Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, who runs away from a residential nursing home to follow his dream of attending the professional wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck.

Described as a modern Mark Twain-style adventure story, Peanut Butter Falcon tells the story of Zak (Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, who runs away from a residential nursing home to follow his dream of attending the professional wrestling school of his idol, the Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). A strange turn of events pairs him on the road with Tyler (LaBeouf), a small-time outlaw on the run, who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find god, catch fish and convince Eleanor (Johnson), a kind nursing home employee charged with Zak’s return, to join them on their journey. The film also stars Bruce Dern, John Hawkes, Jon Bernthal and Yelawolf.

In this comedy-drama, a young man with Down Syndrome runs away from the group home in which he lives in order because he wants to be a professional wrestler. When he encounters a fugitive, both men learn important lessons about life. Shia LaBeouf, Zack Gottsagen, Dakota Johnson, John Hawkes, Bruce Dern, Jon Bernthal and Thomas Haden Church star.

A modern Mark Twain style adventure story, THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON tells the story of Zak (Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, who runs away from a residential nursing home to follow his dream of attending the professional wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). A strange turn of events pairs him on the road with Tyler (LaBeouf), a small time outlaw on the run, who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find God, catch fish, and convince Eleanor (Johnson), a kind nursing home employee charged with Zak’s return, to join them on their journey.

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON follows Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome who runs away from a residential nursing home to fulfill his dream of attending the pro wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). On the road, Zak meets Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a small-time outlaw who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together, they set out on a wild, life-changing journey and try to convince Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), a kind nursing-home employee charged with bringing Zak back, to join them.

While Tyler shows kindness and encouragement to Zak, he’s also a thief and a vandal (though he does pay for his crimes). Zak, on the other hand, is a wonderful role model for people with Down syndrome. He’s feisty and flawed, and he dares to follow his dreams. A character explains that the term “retarded” infers that a person might be incapable of doing things that others can do, and he insists that Zak can do anything he wants. A character who has previously cared for Zak learns to let him follow his dream.

There’s a regrettable tendency in Hollywood to employ actors with Down syndrome either as harbingers of weirdness (see Lars von Trier’s miniseries The Kingdom ) or as irrepressible life forces that are mostly around to remind uptight normal” characters what’s really important. A smidgen of the latter can be found in The Peanut Butter Falcon, which pairs Shia LaBeouf with newcomer Zack Gottsagen, who has Down syndrome. This quirky indie buddy movie’s basic premise strongly recalls the largely forgotten Belgian dramedy The Eighth Day , for which Daniel Auteuil and Pascal Duquenne (who likewise has Down syndrome) jointly won Cannes’ Best Actor prize back in 1996. But Gottsagen is too lively to be completely pinned down by feel-good clichés, and his unpredictability brings out the best in LaBeouf. As in most buddy pictures, so long as the chemistry works, all else is forgivable.

Tyler, a troubled thief and fisherman, is turned away from selling his stolen crabs at the local crab shack because he does not have a license. After a confrontation with the crabbers, he burns $12,000 worth of equipment on the docks and is pursued by the incensed miscreants Duncan and Ratboy. Tyler escapes on his aging boat, which Zak happens to be hiding on. He discovers Zak on board and attempts to leave him behind once they reach shore. However, he witnesses a thirteen-year-old bullying Zak to jump in the water, even though he can’t swim. Tyler intervenes and permits Zak to come with him, and agrees to accompany Zak to the wrestling school en route to his ultimate destination in Florida.



It’s the scenes of these two misfits traipsing through the less-trod parts of our rural U.S. of A. that give The Peanut Butter Falcon — that’s Zak’s future wrestling handle, by the way — that give the movie its beguiling sense of possibility and its offbeat charm. Gottsagen couldn’t be a more appealing companion to LaBeouf’s cranky, yet surprisingly paternal fuck-up. And though Shia’s considerable screen presence has taken a backseat to his self-destructive, tabloid-friendly tendencies over the last decade, both this film and the upcoming Honey Boy serve as excellent showcases for his second act — a notion that syncs nicely with the film’s never-too-late-to-follow-your-bliss sensibility. It may or may not be a spoiler to say that Johnson’s Eleanor, who was Zak’s caretaker back at the home and is trying to retrieve him, finally catches up to the duo. Soon, it’s a trio rafting their way down the river.

Zak, played by Zack Gottsagen who has Down syndrome, lives in a retirement community where Eleanor (Dakota Johnson) works and cares for him. Most of his days are spent watching an old wrestling video about his hero, Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). It seems that Zak’s dream is to escape from North Carolina to Florida to attend his idol’s professional wrestling school. With some soap, a little clothing and help from a friend, he successfully escapes, and that’s when he meets fisherman Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), an outlaw on the run who is battling demons from past mistakes. With little money but a lot of heart, the two embark on an adventure and quickly grow close.

Starring: Shia LaBeouf as Tyler, Dakota Johnson as Eleanor, John Hawkes as Duncan, Bruce Dern as Carl, Thomas Haden Church as “The Salt Water Redneck,” Jon Bernthal as Mark, Mick Foley as Jacob, Jake “The Snake” as Samson, Yelawolf as Ratboy, and introducing Zach Gottsagen as Zak.

In THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON, Zak (Zack Gottsagen) is a young man with Down syndrome. Because he has no family, he’s forced to live in a retirement home, under the care of Eleanor ( Dakota Johnson ). One night, Zak escapes with the help of his roommate, Carl ( Bruce Dern ). Meanwhile, Tyler ( Shia LaBeouf ) is an outlaw North Carolina fisherman who’s alone after his brother’s death and so broke that he resorts to stealing crabs from others’ traps. When Tyler angers two local crabbers ( John Hawkes and Yelawolf), he goes on the run, with Zak quietly hidden in the bottom of his boat. As the pair make their way from North Carolina to Florida – to the wrestling school Zak dreams of attending – they slowly become friends. When a frantic Eleanor catches up to them, she has a tough choice to make: take Zak back, or let him keep pursuing his dream.

Zak, a young man with Down syndrome, runs away from a residential nursing home to fulfill his dream of attending the pro wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck. On the road, Zak meets Tyler, a small-time outlaw who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together, they set out on a wild, life-changing journey and try to convince Eleanor, a kind nursing-home employee charged with bringing Zak back, to join them.

After an early escape attempt fails, a facility employee named Eleanor (Dakota Johnson) labels Zak a flight risk, but with a little help from Carl, he lights off into the night in nothing more than his tighty-whities. The plan: head to Aiden, home of his wrestling idol, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church), who supposedly hosts a school for aspiring wrestlers.

The performances are solid throughout — Dakota Johnson has never been better as the caseworker who sets out on Zak’s tail, and there are small, vivid roles for John Hawkes, Thomas Haden Church, and Bruce Dern, embellished by contributions from nonprofessional locals who turn up in location shooting and give the movie its distinct and vivid local flavor.

Signature Entertainment has revealed that they are to bring on of 2019’s best films, The Peanut Butter Falcon, to the home formats next month. Believe us, this film is exceptional, heartwarming… everything. It will land on digital 10th February, DVD 24th February & Blu-ray on 2nd March.

Fate predictably intervenes and Johnson’s Eleanor finds them. She has no choice but to accompany them on their trip to find Salt Water. That’s no surprise. Neither are the love story hints that have all the subtlety of a swing and a miss by a pro wrassler that somehow manages to knock down the opponent.

The Peanut Butter Falcon is an adventure story set in the world of a modern Mark Twain that begins when Zak (22), a young man with Down syndrome, runs away from the nursing home where he lives to chase his dream of becoming a professional wrestler by attending the wrestling school The Salt Water Redneck. Through circumstances beyond their control Tyler (32), a small-time outlaw on the run, becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find God, catch fish, and convince Eleanor (28), a kind nursing home employee with a story of her own, to join them on their journey.

Zak, a 22-year-old with Down syndrome , lives in a retirement home in North Carolina where he is cared for by Eleanor. He dreams of becoming a professional wrestler and attending the wrestling school of his hero, the Salt Water Redneck, whose videos he watches obsessively. After a failed escape attempt, Zak sneaks out of the home late at night with the assistance of his elderly roommate, Carl. He stows away on a small fishing boat for the night.

The Peanut Butter Falcon’s greatest charm lies in its simplicity, something Nilson and Schwartz leaned on during their creative process. After Gottsagen charged the two with creating the film, they brainstormed how they could build a story around a lead with Down syndrome. Nilson, an Outer Banks native, found inspiration in his North Carolina roots.

Some of the adventures work better than others. Some of it feels contrived. But these are nitpicks in the face of what “The Peanut Butter Falcon” accomplishes. Both LaBeouf and Johnson (and later, Church) approach their roles with ease and simplicity, highlighting Gottsagen (who has studied acting since he was a child) beautifully. Johnson’s irrepressible sense of humor serves her well as an actress (even in the ” Fifty Shades of Grey ” franchise), and watching her react to LaBeouf’s initial flirtation—trying to maintain her boundaries all while she is drawn into his humorous rat-a-tat—is just a small example of what this film—and its cast—does really well. Church’s eventual appearance as The Salt Water Redneck does not occur as planned. Nothing really does.

Zak, a 22 year old man with Down Syndrome, runs away from a care home to pursue his dream of becoming a professional wrestler. Small time criminal, Tyler, becomes his accidental companion and together they undertake a Mark Twain-like adventure across the country.

SAMSON (51) lives in a shed on The Salt Water Redneck’s property. He never quite made it to professional” wrestler but backyard Sunday matches are still the place he feels most alive. With the cinematic and narrative quality, viewers would never have guessed that “The Peanut Butter Falcon” is writers and directors Tyler Nilson’s and Michael Schwartz’s feature film debuts.

This name of this film comes from the wrestling name that Zak decides to take as a part of his aspirations to attend a wrestling school. Refusing to be deterred, Gottsagen tasked his new friends Nilson and Schwartz with creating a role tailor-made for him, despite the fact that neither had any experience in the film industry.


The Peanut Butter Falcon is a wonderful, feel-good film starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, Zack Gottsagen, Thomas Haden Church and Bruce Dern. Its world premiere was at the South by Southwest festival, where the film won the Audience Award in the ‘Narrative Spotlight’ category.

Elsewhere, personal tragedy has left Tyler (Shia LaBeouf) unable to cope with the world. At the loosest of ends, sleeping rough and incapable (unwilling?) of holding a steady job, he survives solely by stealing the caged catches of other crab fishermen. But that’s a dangerous gamble, when everybody similarly scrambles to stay alive; Tyler runs afoul of rival fishermen Duncan (John Hawkes) and Ratboy (Southern rapper Yelawolf), who threaten to kill him.

With no family to care for him, Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, finds himself living in a retirement home on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Much to the frustration of his sympathetic caregiver, Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), the state government has warehoused him there for the past two years for lack of a more suitable facility.

Tyler: Knowing Zack well and building The Peanut Butter Falcon” around him helped define the themes that were best for the story to address and even the types of words and phrases his character uses. Zack’s range of life experiences are real, so the hope was that writing with them in mind would ground the emotional beats and allow them to feel authentic even in an imagined world.

In “The Peanut Butter Falcon,” Zak (Zack Gottsagen, left) and Tyler (Shia LaBeouf) gradually become friends. Rating explained: The Peanut Butter Falcon” is rated PG-13, but does include a few instances of R-rated profanity, some derogative slurs, violence and some frightening moments.

Publicity for Falcon” teases the action as a contemporary riff on Mark Twain, and the filmmakers’ pursuit of this tone is clear enough, from the fellas’ various close-call misadventures to their cobbling together of a scrap-lumber raft. Eleanor (Johnson) catches up and joins them for some lazy-hazy sailing, butting heads with Tyler before seeing past his rough edges as Zak does. We can see the full picture clearly, too — so much so, finally, that this easygoing odyssey offers no real surprises.

Zak (Zack Gottsagen) is a young man with Down syndrome who dreams of becoming a professional wrestler. Since he has no family, and the area is short on accommodations, Zak has been living in a senior assisted living facility. His roommate Carl (Bruce Dern) is a nice enough old guy, willing to put up with Zak watching his favorite old wrestling VHS tape constantly, but Zak longs to bust out of Dodge and realize his wrestling dreams.

A modern Mark Twain style adventure story, The Peanut Butter Falcon tells the story of Zak (Zack Gottsagen), a young man with Down syndrome, who runs away from a residential nursing home to follow his dream of attending the professional wrestling school of his idol, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). A strange turn of events pairs him on the road with Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), a small time outlaw on the run, who becomes Zak’s unlikely coach and ally. Together they wind through deltas, elude capture, drink whisky, find God, catch fish, and convince Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), a kind nursing home employee charged with Zak’s return, to join them on their journey.

Written and directed by Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz. Starring Shia LaBeouf, Dakota Johnson, Zack Gottsagen. At Coolidge Corner, Kendall Square, suburbs. 96 minutes. PG-13 (thematic content, language throughout, some violence, smoking).

As they traverse the string of islands fate brings the two together and they quickly bond. Zak has to avoid being captured and returned to his prison of sorts by Dakota Johnson’s social worker. Tyler has to stay out of the way of John Hawkes’ Duncan.

After running away from the nursing home where he lives, he single-mindedly sets out to make this dream come true. Before long he meets Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), who is also on the run. These two unlikely allies manage to escape and together they experience the wildest of adventures. They even convince the kind-hearted Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), an employee at the nursing home, to join them on their journey.

Categories Movies