knives out cast showtimes – Knives Out At An AMC Theatre Near You.

This is probably the best network television movie money could buy. Is that Sondheim’s Losing My Mind,” from Follies? He was nominated for his performances in the leading role in Layer Cake (2004), and received other awards and nominations.

knives out movie times – Our Critics Discuss Rian Johnson’s Knives Out

Knives OutWhen renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. Director Johnson has at his disposal an embarrassment of riches. In addition to Craig, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Shannon, Don Johnson, Chris Evans and Toni Collette are all elegant pieces on this three-dimensional chess board. Frank Oz even takes a break from breathing life into Miss Piggy and Fozzie Bear to portray a reasonably life-like attorney. With so many of these actors playing against type, the pleasure they all take in this enterprise is almost palpable. However, it’s Ana de Armas (Blade Runner 2049,” War Dogs”) as Marta who most fully commands attention. De Armas will next be seen alongside Craig in the 2020 James Bond installment No Time to Die.” Get used to seeing her. She’ll be in at least four major films next year.

Crabby but sensible old codger Harlan Thrombey ( Christopher Plummer ) has amassed a fortune from his career as a prolific writer of mysteries. Then, on the morning after his 85th birthday, he’s found dead, apparently by his own hand. The last person to see him alive was the woman hired to care for him, a nurse named Marta (Ana de Armas), a Latina immigrant whose family depends on her job. Harlan had always adored Marta, and those in his immediate orbit claim to love her too: His daughter, crisp-mannered businesswoman Linda ( Jamie Lee Curtis ) and son, earnest but hapless Walt (Michael Shannon), sing her praises. Joni ( Toni Collette ), a somewhat shallow lifestyle guru who’s the widow of another son, also heartily approves.

The next day, Blanc, along with Marta and the police, search the house and its surroundings for clues, many of which Marta is able to cover up before the detectives can find them. Since it is the day of Harlan’s will reading, the family anxiously awaits the reveal, and are shocked to hear that Harlan left everything to Marta, including his inheritance, the house, and his company. Despite the family’s kindness to Marta the night prior, they quickly turn on her but Ransom helps her escape. Ransom and Marta then go to a local restaurant where Ransom coaxes Marta into telling him everything.

Marta tricks Ransom into confessing by lying that Fran has survived and will implicate him; after he confesses and vows revenge, she vomits on him, revealing the lie. Enraged, he attacks her with a knife but discovers it is a retractable stage knife. Ransom is taken into custody while Marta watches the Thrombeys from what is now her mansion.

Knives Out surprises audiences by showing how Harlan died very early on. He was being given his nighttime medication by his nurse, Marta (Ana de Armas) when the medication was knocked over. Marta picked up the vials but, after giving Harlan the injections, realized that she had switched the vials and accidentally given him a lethal dose of morphine. To make matters worse, the antidote was strangely missing from her medicine bag. Knowing that she would be blamed for his death and her mother could be deported amid the scandal, Harlan gave Marta careful instructions to be seen leaving the house, then return later so that she could go downstairs disguised as Harlan. This would pin his hour of death to a time after Marta had already left.

Rian Johnson put his own spin on Dashiell Hammett with 2005’s Brick. Now he’s Johnsonised the work of Agatha Christie, with equally enjoyable results. Knives Out is snappy, meta and, yes, sharp. Knives Out writer-director Rian Johnson is already working on a sequel script, with a new murder mystery for Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig).

JOHNSON: Some of the immediate political stuff obviously sprang up out of the last couple of years, but weirdly, the basic bones of what it’s about—who Marta is as a character, and how that applies to the family—I’ve had for years and years, right before the election. That’s always been in the bones of it.

But the movie is also beautifully balanced among its excellent cast, with each member feeling appealingly human and shining in individual moments. Visually, Knives Out is splendid, fluid in the way it moves around the nooks and crannies of the huge house and also when it lingers on its unforgettable “wheel of knives” centerpiece. The music by Nathan Johnson (Rian’s cousin) is equally effective. Old-fashioned on the surface, the movie is nevertheless rooted in the modern-day, with several smart, sane references to current insanity. Finally, it’s clearly designed for multiple viewings, not only to catch all the sly jokes but also the many concealed clues. If Knives Out has a flaw, it’s that the movie is so effortless it might feel lightweight.

Private investigator Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig, having barrel-aged his Southern accent in a bourbon cask) is hired because, Something is afoot with this whole affair.” The detective, who name-checks Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow,” pairs beautifully with more dutiful police Lieutenant Elliott (LaKeith Stanfield).

Acclaimed writer and director Rian Johnson (BRICK, LOOPER, THE LAST JEDI) pays tribute to mystery mastermind Agatha Christie in KNIVES OUT, a fun, modern-day murder mystery where everyone is a suspect. When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death. With an all-star ensemble cast including Chris Evans, Ana De Armas, Jamie Lee Curtis, Don Johnson, Michael Shannon, Toni Collette, LaKeith Stanfield, Katherine Langford and Jaeden Martell, KNIVES OUT is a witty and stylish whodunit guaranteed to keep audiences guessing until the very end.

Curtis, Don Johnson and Collette have the most fun one-upping each other, in terms of catty hauteur and mutual antipathy. Shannon’s Walt isn’t in their league; he’s more a whining victim, apt to be humiliated by his father and siblings. We don’t see much of Evans’ Ransom for quite some time, although his fleeting appearance — on the night of his grandfather’s birthday bash — is explosive.

Marta believes she is responsible for Harlan’s death and many uproarious moments transpire when Blanc suggests that she co-investigate the case with him as the Watson to his Holmes. While playing the faithful servant, Marta comically attempts to cover her own tracks.

Thrombey is extremely wealthy with an expansive family of spoon-fed, entitled eccentrics that would likely mix well with the dynasty of HBO’s Succession.” And as much intrigue as there is about Harlan’s death, for his children there’s even more about his inheritance. There’s his relator daughter Linda (Jamie Lee Curtis) and her cheating husband Richard (Don Johnson), a vocal Trump supporter; his son Walt (a sweater-wearing Michael Shannon) who runs his father’s publishing house; lifestyle guru daughter-in-law Joni (Toni Collette); and his playboy grandson Ransom (Chris Evans), the black sheep of the family.

When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death.

Following the divisive response to his 2017 release Star Wars: The Last Jedi , Johnson turned his attention to Knives Out. A whodunnit” in the vein of an Agatha Christie novel, the film centers on the death of a wealthy family’s patriarch (Christopher Plummer).

Knives Out also shows the human touch: The ensemble cast is terrific—these actors make it look as if the movie were a lark to make. De Armas, who was surprisingly memorable as a hologram-wife in Denis Villeneuve’s Blade Runner 2049 , brings sharply focused subtlety to her role here. In a movie filled with intentionally and often comically broad characters, she’s playing a person, not a type. Marta doesn’t radiate virtuousness as a character trait; kindness just finds its way out as she moves and breathes.

Rian Johnson’s whodunit hit Knives Out is set for home release in February with some fun special features, like an eight-part making-of documentary. DEADLINE: It might seem like a bit of a leap to imagine Craig playing a Southern detective like Benoit Blanc.


The plot is ridiculously complicated, of course. There are several prime suspects in the murder of Harlan Thrombey, whose throat was slit on the night of his 85th birthday party. The man assigned to crack the case (assigned by whom is another mystery) is Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig), “the last of the gentleman sleuths,” as someone amusingly puts it. Blanc is a Poirot-like outsider, a southerner who sounds as if he’s mumbling through a mouthful of magnolias. He’s about as far removed from James Bond as Craig could possibly get, and the actor seems to be enjoying the respite (although he doesn’t do a lot of virtuoso crime-solving of the sort you might expect).

For Rian Johnson, who wrote and directed Knives Out after working on Star Wars: The Last Jedi, breaking the whodunit’s comforting and familiar elements out of their hermetically sealed jewel box” was key to the project. Around the film’s release last week, I spoke with Johnson about reworking old tropes in new ways, dealing with toxic fandom, and Chris Evans’ sweater.

Knives Out is in a lot of ways a classic whodunnit, it follows an eccentric detective, Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig, reprising his Southern drawl from ‘Logan Lucky’) as he investigates the death of a wealthy crime fiction novelist, Harlan Thrombley (Christopher Plummer), and questions the family of suspects who could have murdered him. Rian Johnson’s film pays homage to the work of Agatha Christie with every staple that Christie purists could hope for, – the larger-than-life cast of suspects, the old ornate Victorian home, the big reveal scene where our brilliant detective puts everything together – and yet Knives Out feels completely fresh.

Instead, our detective calls almost immediately. Enter Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig), a flamboyant Louisiana investigator of such renown that he’s already been profiled in the New Yorker as the last of the gentleman sleuths.” Even with such immaculate set dressing all around him (the mystery writer’s house is decorated throughout with murder weapons, including a throne of knives), Craig still manages to chew plenty of scenery with his heavily accented Southern-style Poirot. One calls him Foghorn Leghorn,” another CSI: KFC.” He’s accompanied by another detective (an underused Lakeith Stanfield) but he quickly makes Marta his sidekick; she has a useful aversion to lies, throwing up every time she tells one.

Acclaimed writer and director Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) pays tribute to mystery mastermind Agatha Christie in KNIVES OUT, a fresh, modern-day murder mystery where everyone is a suspect. When renowned crime novelist Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer) is found dead at his estate just after his 85th birthday, the inquisitive and debonair Detective Benoit Blanc (Daniel Craig) is mysteriously enlisted to investigate. From Harlan’s dysfunctional family to his devoted staff, Blanc sifts through a web of red herrings and self-serving lies to uncover the truth behind Harlan’s untimely death.

Whodunnits in the vein of Agatha Christie — like Knives Out, a romping delight from genre-bending Last Jedi auteur Rian Johnson — require a degree of prejudice in the reader in order to work properly. Characters are slotted into a type, usually owing to their occupation, nationality, or social standing, and then the fun of the story comes from how people act against (or within) type, subverting our guesses.

JOHNSON: It felt really good. I had a great experience on Star Wars, but it did feel really refreshing and good to just jump in and not be precious, and just turn out a quick, fun thing. I love speed, I love working fast, and I love how it makes you concentrate on just the important stuff. And look, Star Wars movies take a long time because they take a long time. There’s a lot of big machinery that needs to be built for them. But it was refreshing just to jump in real quick and do it.

As the Knives Out film advances, the mysterious death of Plummer’s character, patriarch of a wealthy family, is what initiates a complicated criminal investigation where anyone can be the murderer. During the process, two detectives will discover twisted family secrets.

Rian Johnson’s twisty murder mystery Knives Out has a lot of surprises, and the ending reveals the true tragedy behind the death of famous author Harlan Thrombey (Christopher Plummer). The film stars Daniel Craig as Benoit Blanc , a private investigator hired to investigate Harlan’s apparent suicide following a birthday party at his home. Over the course of the film, Benoit discovers that every member of Harlan’s family had a motive to kill him – whether it was covering up a secret affair, or securing a stake in his enormous fortune. But while each of them is guilty of one sin or another, only one of them actually plotted to kill Harlan: his grandson, Hugh Ransom Drysdale ( Chris Evans ).

Marta drives with Ransom to the medical examiner’s office, only to find it up in flames and swarming with police. At Ransom’s insistence, Marta checks her email, and finds an address and time. Blanc spots the pair before they engage in a car chase, but Marta and Ransom are ultimately unable to evade their pursuers before Ransom is arrested after Wanetta, Harlan’s mother and elderly matriarch of the family, falsely identified Marta as him at the house. Marta drives to the address only to find Fran there, drugged. Marta performs CPR on her, and calls the police phone line, ensuring that Fran gets to the hospital safely. On the drive back to the mansion, Marta reveals everything to Blanc, who discourages her from confessing to the family. However, Blanc tells her to stop at the last minute when he spots something in a copy of the full toxicology report that Fran had hidden away.


Crabby but sensible old codger Harlan Thrombey ( Christopher Plummer ) has amassed a fortune from his career as a prolific writer of mysteries. Then, on the morning after his 85th birthday, he’s found dead, apparently by his own hand. The last person to see him alive was the woman hired to care for him, a nurse named Marta (Ana de Armas), a Latina immigrant whose family depends on her job. Harlan had always adored Marta, and those in his immediate orbit claim to love her too: His daughter, crisp-mannered businesswoman Linda ( Jamie Lee Curtis ) and son, earnest but hapless Walt (Michael Shannon), sing her praises. Joni ( Toni Collette ), a somewhat shallow lifestyle guru who’s the widow of another son, also heartily approves.


With an all-star ensemble cast including Chris Evans, Ana de Armas, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette, Don Johnson, Michael Shannon, LaKeith Stanfield, Katherine Langford and Jaeden Martell, KNIVES OUT is a fun, witty and stylish whodunnit guaranteed to keep audiences guessing until the very end.

Acclaimed writer and director Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) pays tribute to mystery mastermind Agatha Christie in KNIVES OUT, a fun, modern-day murder mystery where everyone is a suspect. Closed captioning and audio descriptive capable. A detective investigates the death of a patriarch of an eccentric, combative family. Runtime: 130 min.

As you might expect in a movie built around myriad deceptions, we see many characters lie and attempt to mislead either the police or each other—sometimes going to extreme lengths to do so. Also important: The movie encourages us at times to root against the police. Family members, we learn, have taken advantage of Harlan’s financial generosity.

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