rich brian tour merch – Old Indonesian Rapper Rich Chigga

His wandering melodies and laidback style give each song enough substance to enjoy even without lyrics, while also being smooth enough to avoid distracting from the bars he puts on there. Also loved hearing from August 08.

rich brian tour setlist 2019 – Similar Artists

RICH BRIANIndonesian rapper Rich Brian premieres the official video for new single “100 Degrees” today. In a 2016 reaction video to Indonesian rapper Brian Imanuel’s Dat $tick,” Wu-Tang Clan member Dennis Coles, who raps as Ghostface Killah,” couldn’t believe the then 16-year-old’s grasp on the type of Southern hip-hop popular online.

No Worries” comes off as a different, classic-age pop song at first. It’s not easy to consume the odd singing portion of the track, yet it contains possibly my favorite rap verse in the entire album. After the cyclical beat’s fade into a more intense pacing, Rich Brian comes alive with a speedy, friction-felt verse that feels like it’s gliding on rails yet teeming with alacrity. The instrumental beat is truly amazing. However, the song may greatly lose replayability due to its lackluster first half.

Despite being released in the fall, this is truly a summer album, as it makes you think of the fun moments you had during that time. Hopefully, you will put some of these songs on your summer playlist soon.

At this point, he did not speak English. But, with Rubik’s Cube tutorials and YouTube videos on cinematography (another interest of his) as his aural guides, he realized he was quick at learning it. What happened next is the story of what happens to everyone who finds their home on the Internet: he happily got lost in it. He can’t remember the exact genealogy of things, but he eventually fell into a community of like-minded young people on Twitter — Americans, mostly, 13 hours ahead; he’d wake up early in the morning to interface with them. By his own account, these were his only friends. He had an uncannily quick fluency in the deeply nuanced surrealist humor that is associated with a loose confederation of comically ironic nihilists often referred to as Weird Twitter.

Over the past few years, Asian representation has grown immensely in mainstream media. Since the premiere of the 2018 romantic comedy Crazy Rich Asians (Hollywood’s first movie with an all-Asian cast in 25 years), milestones have continued to hit for Asians in entertainment. Asians are now playing lead roles in films – including Vietnamese actress Lana Condor in Netflix’s film, To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before , Chinese-Korean actress and rapper Awkwafina in The Farewell and Korean actor John Cho in Searching.

Rich Brian’s 2018 album Amen” was a good, standard rap album with some really great songs but didn’t really bring anything new to the table. Glow Like Dat” (my personal favorite) is one of the best breakup songs, and Cold” is perfect while driving on 405 at night. However, the album doesn’t keep me interested past See Me” and feels repetitive halfway through.

It’s a big gamble to have Rich Brian less involved in the production for Amen. On one hand, we could hear a renaissance in Rich Brian’s music through all the collaboration with new artists. On the other hand, it’s easy to take too much outside advice as a young up-and-comer on your first label-backed project and lose creative control of the whole process. Being pulled in different directions by a slew of unfamiliar collaborators and new producers can make it hard to retain your music’s identity.

Shortly after the release of “Dat $tick,” hip hop critics characterized Imanuel’s style of music as “ironic” and “gruff yet agile.” Despite the running themes of humor and self-aware irony in his early works, Imanuel has since tried to distance himself from being a comedic rapper with more serious singles like “Seventeen” and “Glow like Dat.” In various interviews, Imanuel has cited Young Thug, Tyler The Creator, Childish Gambino and Yung Lean as his influences.

As part of the Miami-based group 2 Live Crew, the Trinidad-born, Afro-Chinese Christopher Wong Won, who performed as Fresh Kid Ice,” made hip-hop history twice : first when a federal appeals court judge overturned a ruling that the group’s third album, 1989’s As Nasty As They Wanna Be,” was obscene and again when the Supreme Court granted them the right to parody other artists commercially.


Two years, one Billboard charting album, and one name-change since Dat $tick,” Immanuel is working on transitioning into the type of fame that is often unattainable for even the most viral stars. He has been Airbnb-hopping in Los Angeles, plotting an acting career and laying down Red Bull-fuelled bars in preparation for the upcoming Head in the Clouds tour with his fellow 88Rising label mates. Speaking with Immanuel in a cloud of JUUL vapor, 10 stories above the LA’s notorious bootleg t-shirt district Santee Alley, it immediately becomes clear that his ambitions are limitless and unironic.

Rich Brian and Chung Ha have teamed up on their smooth new single These Nights,” a new song off of the upcoming Head in the Clouds II collaborative album from 88rising. PETALING JAYA, Oct 22 — Indonesian rapper Rich Brian was lovestruck after catching sight of one of his fans during a recent show in the US.

This is a fitting closing song to the emotionally dense 88rising sophomore album, Head In The Clouds II. Rich Brian’s reflective and emotive performance finishes the album in a personal, dreamy performance.

Brian rides for his home in the album visuals, too. A short video featuring the title track features him rapping from the middle of a large, formal family portrait, while the Kids” video is an homage to his hometown of Jakarta. His wide-angle takes on his career offer some of the most resonant moments on The Sailor. When he acknowledges that he is, by far, the biggest rapper to ever come out of Southeast Asia, his music takes on a greater meaning.RICH BRIAN

Brian now seems to have a newfound appreciation for music, hip-hop, and what he wants to represent visually and musically. It feels more authentic and serious, far from parody music. The newly-released “See Me” leans harder on melody than trap, more honest reflection than fabricated slick talk. The vibe is early Cudi—he’s a walking influence of the blog age. He’s more of an artist than a comedian, more so than someone like Lil Dicky, who similarly toes that line but tends to fall closer to a joke than serious artistry.

The Sailor was recorded over the last year between New York, Los Angeles and Jakarta. The album features singles Yellow ” and Kids ” which have been streamed 25 million times globally. Album highlights include summer anthem 100 Degrees,” Where Does The Time Go,” which features 88rising labelmate Joji, and Rapapapa,” which includes a spoken word verse from Wu-Tang Clan legend RZA. The Sailor was executive produced by Brian, Bekon & The Donuts, and 88rising founder Sean Miyashiro.

Keith Ape and his Cohort rap crew were so heavily inspired by OG Maco’s U Guessed It” that the Atlanta rapper took offense before he received a portion of the publishing royalties Dat $tick” was Imanuel replicating trap music he had heard online.

The result is ‘Introvert’, which along with ‘Cold’ marks a great entrypoint into Rich Brian’s style, drifting somewhere between the restrained trap of Drake and the stoned soul of Frank Ocean and The Internet. What gives him the edge in an arguably overcrowded genre is his skills off-mic (he produced or co-produced nearly every track), and his deadpan flow, digging into personalised rhymes about the pitfalls of wide attention, the loneliness of fame, long-distance relationships, and his family.

Whatever your opinion is on Rich Brian, his talent and success are undeniable. On Spotify, he is the second most streamed rapper in Indonesia, just behind Post Malone. His popularity on the music streaming platform even led to a collaboration in promoting his latest album The Sailor, which dropped in July.

While ‘cultural appropriation’ is a relatively recent term, the concept is nothing new. Hip-hop has long been built on sampling, which is, by nature, appropriation of a kind. The genre operates in an economy of signifiers whereby culture is exchanged, borrowed, credited, amplified, distorted. And 88rising? If you fuck the rules” (a lyric from the hit single Midsummer Madness”), you fuck with the system—and there’s nothing more hip-hop than that.

Founder Sean Miyashiro’s most current efforts began in 2015, when Park hipped him to Korean rap upstart Keith Ape. Miyashiro helped Ape get a performance slot at Austin festival South by Southwest and became his manager. He also had a hand in having Complex produce and premiere the video for the remix of It G Ma,” which featured Park and fellow rappers Waka Flocka Flame, Father, and A$AP Ferg.

Yet, often times throughout the album’s 12-song, 44-minute run time, we also see Imanuel reflect on times where the kids” he mentioned didn’t even know who he was- times of racial prejudice, familial stress, and economic hardships. While Imanuel has certainly made it by today’s standards, The Sailor” makes it clear that it’s not necessarily about the destination, but the journey, that makes the Sailor into the Captain.

Whenever I was writing something, I always think about how I should separate myself from other people and why should people listen to me. Every time I make new songs, it’s always been about finding little unique things that I can put in my music or my videos or just my personality, I guess, like how I talk to people online. Little things like that.

Some of that media attention was for calling out the 16-year-old’s gun-waving, liquor-pouring, ‘N’-word dropping clip as a problematic parody of hip hop culture. But others interpreted it as sly satire, looking to Brian’s impressive drill-trap flow and lyricism as proof of his talent (including Ghostface Killah, who fronted up for a remix ).

Born in Jakarta, Indonesia, in 1999, Rich Brian learned to speak English watching YouTube clips and studying the deliveries of rappers like Macklemore, Kanye West, and Childish Gambino. When he was still known as Rich Chigga, he broke through with the viral video for his single “Dat $tick,” which gained the attention of the rap community and has since clocked up over 100 million views. A name change, a record deal, and a move to Los Angeles later, Rich Brian’s debut LP, ‘Amen,’ peaked at No. 18 on the Billboard 200. Now under his belt Brian has an Indonesian Choice Awards Breakthrough Act of the Year accolade, collaborations with other artists including 21 Savage, Ghostface Killah, and Diplo, and a claim to the title of first Asian artist to hit No. 1 on the iTunes hip-hop charts.

As a teenager in Indonesia, Rich Brian was obsessed with the film La La Land. I remember Emma Stone talking about people that have crazy, huge dreams, and people that have dreams that don’t make any sense,” he says of watching the Hollywood blockbuster. And I just related to that so much. I got really emotional watching that movie.” The city of stars that the movie revolves around is now home to the 19-year-old Chinese-Indonesian rapper, who upped sticks to the US from Jakarta two years ago.


Indigo” is a strong R&B track with the catchiest backtrack that won’t get out of your head, and Hopscotch” is one of the most authentic rap songs on the album as the verses layer over a grime-esque production sound.

While mainstream (whiter) audiences may not be familiar with his name, the rapper has been deemed an unexpected favorite among Asian listeners and beyond for years, representing a racial group in a genre where they continue to struggle with legitimacy. Now at 20 years old, he’s weeks away from embarking on The Sailor” North American tour, promoting his recent sophomore album of the same name. His new tracks evidence a more sophisticated, evolved artist compared to the earlier work that propelled him to his prominent place in the Asian hip-hop movement.


Rich Brian: I think, I don’t really feel any more pressure than before. It’s always been the same. The only thing that I have to do to represent Indonesia is continuing what I love to do. You know, making art and making music that I feel like is something fresh and new, and just continue what I’m doing. And I think that’s a good representation. It would be as simple as seeing someone that looks like you, somebody that reminds you of yourself, doing just want they want to do, and kinda succeed getting that. And I think that is a representation of me as an Indonesian person.

In early October, Rich Brian uploaded a photo to his Instagram stories. The image appeared to be a screenshot of a video filmed during one of his concerts. Has anyone been as productive with their love of YouTube and meme culture than ocean-hopping rap success Rich Brian? Short answer: probably not.

I think one of the biggest things I learned with this new album—it’s a lot more vivid lyrically. You can really understand everything that I’m saying. On the last album, I was a lot more focused on the sounds and the flow instead of the actual message that I was sending. I wasn’t really sure what kind of rapper I wanted to be and where my place was in hip-hop. Recently, I realized you can literally talk about anything. You don’t have to only talk about getting money, doings shows, or whatever. It’s all a matter of how you word things, and I realized that while I was going through a four-month period of writer’s block. And now, I feel like I’ve kind of found my writing style here. That was one of the biggest things I was really conscious about while making this new album.

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