RUN THE JEWELS – Run The Jewels 2 Remix Meow The Jewels On Kickstarter

But one of the most amazing things about this project is people are telling us what they see in it, and there’s this surprising, and really touching kind of consistency with these reactions.

run the jewels merch europe – Everything We Know About Run The Jewels 4 So Far

RUN THE JEWELSEl-P and Killer Mike, two of the most distinctive and celebrated names in rap, might have seemed like an unlikely pairing on paper, but the duo subverted and pulverized all expectations with their critically lauded Run The Jewels collaborative LP. Tapping into the creative synergy they’d discovered in 2012 on Mike’s R.A.P. Music album (produced by El-P) and El’s Cancer 4 Cure album (featuring Mike), Run The Jewels cemented their musical alliance with a set of uncompromisingly raw, forward thinking hip-hop, garnering limitless critical accolades including the likes of Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, XXL, SPIN, New York Times, and many more. Andy Warhol painted in the ‘80s too, and he was a pop artist. If you’re talking about (Jean-Michel) Basquiat, or you’re gonna rap about photographers, know who Irving Penn is. You gonna talk about the Harlem Renaissance, compare yourself to Zora Neale Hurston or Countee Cullen – it doesn’t always have to be (Langston) Hughes. So, I’m Gordon Parks – because I like shooting shit, I wear a cowboy hat, and one day I might make a Blaxploitation movie… and I like taking photos.

Times of desperation have led black boys to horrible decisions the last 30 years in this country. It’s no excuse for any of the things I have done. But with that said, there have been times where I have felt so guilt-ridden and gut-wrenchingly paralyzed with shame I didn’t know what to do. I think the drug dealer deserves a different narrative than what the successful rappers are giving you, and I think the drug dealer deserves a different narrative than what you saw on The Corner” or The Wire.” And that narrative is that you carry around a load because, in my case, it was my mother. My mother got very addicted after a very successful career of being a dealer. And if these stories aren’t told, and if this stuff isn’t normalized, it’s almost like you will have this post dramatic dealer syndrome with people still not right for the things they’ve done.

Their pre-order packages include basic t-shirt and record bundles and deluxe vinyl editions. Or, for $40,000, Run the Jewels will remix their entire album with nothing but cat sounds. EL-P: I know why Bob likes it because Stevie Wonder is Bob’s favorite artist of all time.


One of 2013’s standout rap records is also one of 2014’s best, as Run The Jewels ‘ eponymous debut LP ( review ) is re-issued in an expanded style – with new track ‘Pew Pew Pew’ and two remixes, plus bonus instrumentals – on January 13th via Big Dada.

As with the first two albums, RTJ3” mixes Killer Mike’s searing insights, from the perspective of a black Atlantan with a cadence to match his acuity, with El-P’s beat production and razor-witted, eloquent couplets as a white Brooklynite whose work as a rapper and producer has earned him underground respect and acclaim.

Both rappers have had long, bumpy journeys in different scenes: El-P (born Jaime Meline) was an original member of New York City’s Company Flow and co-founded a record label, Definitive Jux. Killer Mike (aka Michael Render) is Atlanta born-and-bred — he made his debut with a feature on OutKast’s Stankonia and, between numerous solo albums, has collaborated with Big Boi, T.I. and the Dungeon Family collective.

Their timing was right, and not just on a personal level. The more textured, darkly emotional yet still confrontational sound that RTJ developed has filled such a void in ambitious, rock-tinged music that this year’s Grammy committee — according to Killer Mike, who heard it from producer and committee member 9th Wonder — debated whether to place Run the Jewels 2 in the Alternative rather than Hip-Hop category.

BARTOS: It really is. Stevie is going off. You watch this clip and you just can’t help but be, you know, just dragged into the euphoria. I’ve been to a lot of concerts in my life. I’ve spent hours on YouTube. And this has got to be one of the most joyful and intense performances I’ve ever seen.

In the micro, RTJ3 exists because of the work provided on the previous two RTJ albums. The album came out on Christmas Day, two weeks ahead of its original January 13 release date. Yes, people screwed up their year-end release lists once they found out that Mikey and Jamie decided to give the world a Christmas miracle with their third effort. Did they announce, “our bad”? Not really; they moved on to questioning whether or not Drake’s liaison with Jennifer Lopez really needed an insider” to determine whether or not it was real. Or whether or not Soulja Boy was telling the truth in an awkward retelling of a robbery attempt at his studio. RTJ should be the main topic of discussion at the moment. It’s a passionate, almost crossroads moment for both El-P and Killer Mike, and yet it’s flying under a pretense of merely existing. RTJ3 has moments of existential crisis for both men.

KILLER MIKE I was a Rage fan. I was crazy about the moment in the Nineties into the early 2000s where you had aggressive rap groups — like a Cypress Hill, Ice Cube and a PE Public Enemy — and you were able to see them with a Rage, Deftones or Linkin Park. You were able to see all this shit together.

I knew it was the same reason why someone listens to Jimi Hendrix and they want to play a guitar. I wanted to do it because I fell in love with the art form and because it made sense to me. I was in Brooklyn. I was in New York. I was going – riding the trains. I understood graffiti. I understood B-boying. Like, I saw it. I saw people walking around with boomboxes, and that’s how I was hearing the music, you know.

I would love a kid to walk away feeling two things,” he ponders. That they know where the fuck they stand, and at the same time, that they are determined to be a badass. A middle finger in the face of a tornado of shit,” El adds. I’m not capable of giving anyone false hope, but what I can say is this. I can give you a little game, I can give you a little swagger, ‘cos fuck all these motherfuckers. We already lost if it’s not ‘fuck you’. If it’s not ‘fuck you’ we’re already gone. That, to me, from a Brooklyn kid – fuck you is hope,” he laughs.

In the decade or so — roughly the mid-1990s through the mid-2000s — when the independent hip-hop underground was at its peak, it served several purposes, many of them antagonistic. Just as rap music at its glossiest was piercing the American pop mainstream, a purist wing emerged, initially as a rejoinder. But it ultimately developed its own rule book that prized complexity and abrasion.


Killer Mike: Just feel something. People don’t feel anything anymore. People have opinions and witness things, but they don’t feel. I think you need to have moments where people feel the humanity. Why are people so not affected by love as they are by anger and envy? I think, ultimately, what you hear on records like Early” and Crown” is that love pushing through.

Now, at 41, Killer Mike (an Atlanta native whose real name is Michael Render) and El-P (Brooklynite Jaime Meline) are still raising their fists. Run the Jewels 3,” set for physical release Jan. 13 and out now digitally, is one of 2017’s most highly anticipated albums.

When Mike and El-P linked up, they became artistic kindred spirits helping to drag each other out of their respective ditches. Both had a nagging hunger to succeed in music and business. Mike was just getting into the barbershop hustle, which he hoped was less volatile than the rap hustle (he now co-owns two Swag Shops in Atlanta with his wife, Shana Shay Bigga” Render); El-P wanted to prove that he’d learned from his Def Jux glitch. Their 2012 solo albums — R.A.P. Music and El-P’s Cancer 4 Cure (dedicated to Camu Tao) — were among the year’s orneriest best. But when Run the Jewels’ debut followed the next year, it was the delirious snort of a new era.

KM: Absolutely. Kids, that’s what I’m seeing. I’ve got a 16-year-old daughter, and I’ve been amazed at the amount of 16- and 17-year-old children I’ve seen at our shows. Y’know, we’ll be in some places where part of the crowd is sectioned off by a rope. You’re like, Why is that section roped off?” Oh, yeah, those are the children.

The relationship with the fans also helped bring a new dimension to Run the Jewels’ music, which has become more socially and politically explicit on the second and third albums. It also made room for an unexpected introspection and vulnerability to bubble through. On “Thursday in the Danger Room” from the latest album, Killer Mike and El-P mourn friends they have lost in tragic circumstances.

Let’s Go” is launched into orbit on a sludgy nu-metal guitar riff before breaking off its thrusters and becoming the sort of hulking beat-monster El-P is known for. The song is a pretty straightforward RTJ bomb-track, with El-P and Killer Mike trading increasingly spittle-flecked verses. It’s still a creeper, though, one that’s sure to amplify the artistry in an alien monster beatdown, no matter what the critics say.

As anticipation for their forthcoming RTJ3 album continues to mount, megalithic rap duo Run the Jewels have announced their first full scale North American headlining tour since 2015. The Run the World” tour kicks off mid-January in Philadelphia and continues through to the end of February, with stops in veritably every major city in the US along the way. Support for the tour will be provided by Brainfeeder-affiliated hip hop experimentalist The Gaslamp Killer, mysterious underground MC Spark Master Tape, & longtime Killer Mike collaborator CUZ.

Underground hip hop supergroup Run the Jewels finished out 2014 as one of the year’s biggest breakout acts, reaching both a critical and commercial high when their acclaimed sophomore album Run the Jewels 2 reached the Top 10 on the US Rap Albums chart. The record featured the unstoppable combination of producer El-P’s insanely bombastic beats and rapper Killer Mike’s deadly flow, and it served as a rally cry for hip hop lovers around the world looking for something fresh, new, and exciting. The duo’s aggressive rhymes and next-level beats are even more impressive at their live shows, where they deliver take-no-prisoners cuts like “Get It” and “Oh My Darling Don’t Cry” with a raw energy and effortless swagger that make good on all the hype. As they exit the stage after one of their epic performances, one thing is left abundantly clear: Run the Jewels are gunning for the hip hop crown, and there’s nothing anyone can do to stop them.

I think our friendship started with us trying to wow each other with how ill we could be as MCs, but it went deeper than that very soon,” says El-P. Sure, we are artistically connected, but honestly, we are trying to figure out how to heal each other. It went from sparring in a friendly-fire kind of way, some style shit, some dope rap shit, to being how much can we create something that’s ours, that’s between us, that still works as rap music. Doing this shit has made me think about my life differently, but it’s also taken me outside myself as a writer.

About five years ago, Killer Mike and El-P were rappers in their late 30s seemingly destined to be underappreciated for their talents and rich recording histories. Then Run the Jewels happened, and the two seemingly mismatched artists — Killer Mike from the Atlanta orbit of OutKast, El-P from the New York City underground — became one of hip-hop’s most recognizable and beloved duos. They’re now touring 5,000-seat theaters in America, playing to audiences 10 times the size of ones they could command individually.RUN THE JEWELS

KILLER MIKE: Yeah. That’s my man on the grind. That’s my man, man. KILLER MIKE: Yeah, I got music that I play for my daughters, music I play for my sons – when they little girls. KILLER MIKE: I’m an activist, right? I want everybody to be equal. The day after equality happens, I’m talking shit to everybody.

EL-P I’ve been fortunate to work with a lot of people I really admire in other worlds than just rap, and people have dug what I’ve been doing — anyone from Reznor and Zack de la Rocha to Mars Volta. There are through-lines in the aesthetic — definitely in terms of the production. It’s allowed me to get to know people outside of my genre and to work with them. A lot of it is friendship, but stuff like the work I did with Reznor, that came out of him just reaching out. The stuff I did with the Mars Volta, that was the same deal. Zack de la Rocha is someone I’ve known for many years now. When he first split up with Rage in 2000, he came and lived with me in my apartment in Brooklyn for a month straight and we just worked on his record. What was going to be at the time that solo record. We’ve been friends ever since. Through chance encounters while we were making the Run the Jewels stuff, I brought him in to savage effect.

GARCIA: So they perhaps don’t know the context of run it, run the jewels. KILLER MIKE: Yeah, it grew. It progressed. BARTOS: And we’re back. Joining us now in studio is the hip-hop duo and our people, Run the Jewels.

El-P: Tough question. The banana dick apeshit line from ‘Panther Like A Panther’ is pretty impressive. ‘My dick got a Michelin star’ ‘Talk to Me’ was a pretty good one. I think there are only about three dick jokes on the record, but when we do them, we try to make them count, at the top of the art form. On the unicorn horn for a cock line in ‘Legend Has It I love the fact my girlfriend came in and I had her do the ‘stop’ bit. I thought that was funnier. We’re one part heart, and one part completely ridiculous asshole.

Formed after El-P produced Killer Mike’s 2012 album, R.A.P. Music, the duo released their debut offering Run the Jewels (Fool’s Gold). Critically popular and with a sizable underground fan base to boot, Run the Jewels quickly garnered national attention. Their sophomore effort, 2014’s Run the Jewels 2, marked the pair’s first appearance on the Billboard 200. RTJ2 featured appearances by Boots, Travis Barker, Gangsta Boo, and Rage Against the Machine’s Zack de la Rocha, who lent his distinctive vocals to the fiery single, “Close Your Eyes (And Count to Fuck).” A crowd-funded remix version of the album – with all the music replaced by samples of meowing cats – was released in 2015 as Meow the Jewels. It featured guest appearances from Portishead’s Geoff Barrow, Dan the Automator, and Internet feline sensation Lil Bub. The group ended the year with the single “Rubble Kings (Dynamite on the Street),” released by the Adult Swim label.

GARCIA: Today’s guest is the hip-hop duo Run the Jewels. The critically acclaimed and fiercely independent rap team joins us in the studio to talk about how they learned to have fun with their music and about their unexpected friendship. Stretch, tell me about your favorite unlikely duo in music.

El-P: We were trying to do separation of church and state in the US too. It hasn’t really been followed, has it? The funny and interesting thing is that the so-called religious politicians are actually complete 100% atheists. They don’t believe in a fucking thing. That’s just a fact. The people who talk the most about God are people who are the least like God.


I ran a record label for 10 years back in the day, I ran a record label called Def Jux, and it completely collapsed under the weight of the whole music industry, essentially. People stopped buying and we were based on an old model.

That’s why a lot of dealers turn to addicts. A lot of guys in the trap, they spend the money they’re making buying another sedative, whether it be alcohol or marijuana because they realize, you know, they’re selling to their neighbors and they look like you. When you see the slow deterioration of a person over weeks, months or years, that’s not an easy thing to deal with because most of the kids selling out there are compassionate people at heart. The only ones that become really successful are damn near sociopaths.

Times of desperation have led black boys to horrible decisions the last 30 years in this country. It’s no excuse for any of the things I have done. But with that said, there have been times where I have felt so guilt-ridden and gut-wrenchingly paralyzed with shame I didn’t know what to do. I think the drug dealer deserves a different narrative than what the successful rappers are giving you, and I think the drug dealer deserves a different narrative than what you saw on The Corner” or The Wire.” And that narrative is that you carry around a load because, in my case, it was my mother. My mother got very addicted after a very successful career of being a dealer. And if these stories aren’t told, and if this stuff isn’t normalized, it’s almost like you will have this post dramatic dealer syndrome with people still not right for the things they’ve done.

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