talib kweli twitter ados – Samples, Covers And Remixes

But I think we put more in it. Like, we had a string section come in and be on most of the tracks, whereas before I would have had a string section maybe on one or two songs because I would have wanted to be more boom-bap hip-hop feeling.

talib kweli twitter ben shapiro – Monstercat Wiki

TALIB KWELITalib Kweli is an American hip hop recording artist, entrepreneur and social activist. A good friend of mine who’s a plumber told me Trump was going to win, and I told him, “Hell no. That’s impossible. There’s no way.” Because I was in, like, a privileged bubble where I’m going – I’m traveling the world, right, but I’m only seeing and dealing with people that I agree with. I don’t have to get on the train and sit next to someone who’s racist. I don’t have to sit in a cubicle next to someone who doesn’t have the same views as me – and have to deal with them because I need that job. I don’t have to deal with that. So in a lot of ways, I’m protected in that way.


In particular, Kweli showed his artistic reach in Idle Warship. Teaming with longtime collaborator and acclaimed singer Res, Kweli began getting out of his sonic and creative comfort zone on the group’s 2009 mixtape Party Robot and its debut album, 2011’s Habits Of The Heart.

Kweli: Yeah, certainly. My parents were professors, so there was a lot of academic influence in my household. When hip-hop became more conscious, which was considered the golden era of hip-hop from like ’87 to ’91, ’92 maybe, that was when I was in junior high school and the most impressionable. So the movement of hip-hop, which are Poor Righteous Teachers and your X-Clans, was coinciding with what I was learning in my house. Spike Lee — I went to Brooklyn Tech High School. Spike Lee had Spike’s Joint across the street. He was making a Malcolm X movie. You’d go into Spike’s Joint, it’d be all Malcolm X gear and stuff, so all that was coming together for me.

TALIB KWELI: Yeah, I went to see KRS-One perform at the Building in 1991. And I was 15 years old, and I had a camera with me. And I was the first one on line. And I couldn’t get in cause I was 15. It was me and my homeboys. And then Jarobi got us in.

Then that year, everyone kept coming up to me. “Man, you killed it on ‘Get Em High.’ I love that verse.” I’m like, “You don’t know what your talking about. I did not kill it.” Now I’ve had to accept it. And I’ve had to learn – I’ve had to learn to rap it wrong, because people love it so much. Now I love it. Now I’m like, Kanye’s a genius. He knew exactly what he was doing. That’s not how I laid it, but that’s what he heard.

ALI: Yeah. It’s interesting you bringing up AfroPunk reminded me – and I had not thought about this, I don’t know, for nearly almost 30 years until you mentioned AfroPunk. But we used to go to Boys and Girls High where they had, during the summer, the African Festival. So that was like a place to kind of go and feel, from a communal entertaining sort of a sense, your tie to Africa, what really ties us as African-Americans.TALIB KWELI

Kweli shifts gears on Favela Love.” Inspired by and created during a trip to Sao Paulo, Brazil, the breezy song features crooning from Brazilian singer and actor Seu Jorge (City Of God, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou). Kweli and Jorge met in the studio, leading Kweli to deviate from his original concept for the song.

I did spend time in his studio earlier in the year, and we worked on a few songs together. Kanye is someone who is super famous—he’s in the stratosphere. I wouldn’t say I’m in his inner circle, but he started his career with me, and if I really need to I can get in touch with him.

TALIB KWELI: I was one of the last verses on College Dropout. I went to Target – I was on the tour bus. I made the tour bus stop at Target. I was like, “We gotta buy this new Kanye album.” And I was so excited about College Dropout. I didn’t go to hear my song first. I just put it on the bus, and I listened – it was like 14 songs in, “Get Em High.” Like, “Here comes my verse.” He flew my verse in a bar late.

He also tweeted that he doesn’t agree with everything Donald Trump says. How can you be a black dude from the south side of Chicago and work with Mos Def and Common and Dave Chappelle and then say you’re down with the Muslim ban? How can you be down with the wall? He’s not thinking about these things. He’s thinking about Trump as an outsider who was against Obama. That’s a failure on his part. I don’t think he’s studying enough.

It was the one-two punch of Definition” and Re: Definition,” specifically, that illustrated the mastery of the Black Star record. Speaking on violence and liberation, it would be easy for either rapper to mount an off-putting moral high ground. Yet, the simplicity of the Definition” hook, the singsong tone especially, humbled both Mos Def and Talib Kweli. These almost childlike moments scaled back the self-serious atmosphere of the writing and made the lessons of the record easy to digest and internalize. There was no effort required to live with the truths of Black Star because Black Star led with its best, most melodic foot forward.


Black Star did not simply use melody to sugarcoat their politics. The metaphor implies their audience simply went unaware, but that could not be further from the truth. Neither rapper was hiding their ideologies, but rather, the duo found a way to make them palatable and infectious summertime tunes. The goal of Black Star was not to necessarily sneak in political meaning but to make the political approachable and enjoyable. With that, the record was imbued with an aura of soul and heart that could never sound dated, that also colored Kweli’s delivery and the mahogany timbre of the album’s soundscapes. The depth of the bass on Hater Players” felt etched into the breakbeats, and the looming keys on Thieves in the Night” gave a parlor room richness to a five-minute sermon on fighting oppression and mental fortitude.

Everyday that happens to me. I live a hip hop lifestyle, so I surround myself and actively work towards hearing new music. Most people just tune into the radio and turn on the TV or whatever and it’s usually in the background. They’re just hearing what they want to hear and already know, they hear what society is marketing to them. Then that’s all they’re doing, then they’re going to complain about the state of hip hop because they think it’s all about trap music and clubbin’ and stuff like that, you have to do the work to find the good, new music.

As the project’s network expanded, though, he needed new monikers for his partnerships. Knife Knights is the name he gave to his work with Seattle engineer, producer, songwriter, and film composer Erik Blood, a vital force in the Shabazz Palaces universe. Now, after more than a decade of collaboration and the development into of a rich friendship, Butler and Blood have made a proper full-length record together as Knife Knights: 1 Time Mirage, an eleven-track odyssey that finds the pair and a cast of their friends weaving together a singular world of soul and shoegaze, hip-hop and lush noise, bass and bedlam. 1 Time Mirage represents a playground for Butler and Blood, a free space for unfettered exploration, and a radically adventurous start to something much more than a mere production duo or side project.

So I think if someone is saying that — is critical of that in a way where they don’t like it — it’s because they might be tired of what’s going on in commercial hip-hop, and they just don’t wanna hear anything that might resemble it. But I stand by my musical decision with the song because I’m looking at the culture as a whole, for all time — not just what’s going on now.


He was like, “Yeah, the hook should be like, ‘Throw, throw, throw your motherfucking hands! Get ’em high!” And I’m like – you know, I smoke weed, but I was like – I remember that session well. I was like, “I don’t want to make a song about smoking weed for this album.” That’s not where I was for Beautiful Struggle.

Beats, rhymes and life are three of the corners where hip hop intersects. Few other TV shows have been able to cover all of these angles in-depth and authentically quite like REVOLT TV’s “Drink Champs,” which thrives on its candid conversations with the biggest and most influential figures in the game. In honor of such a one-of-a-kind show, REVOLT will be recapping each weekly “Drink Champs” episode, so you can always catch the gems that are dropped in each lit interview.

Kweli: I never doubted that I would be doing this for the rest of my life. I’ve been far more successful than I’ve even dreamed I could be. I was working at a bookstore when I was 19, 20, and I was rapping. I was locally known, and I was doing open mics around the city, and I was ecstatic. I remember thinking then, “Man, if I could just work at this bookstore forever” — that was back in the days when that was a viable option to, like, work at a bookstore — “If I could just work at this bookstore and rap.” I had kids very young, so I was, like, if I could raise my kids doing what I love — that to me is the definition of success.

I think we’re seeing Kanye reacting to not feeling love from Obama. That’s what he relates to about Trump more than anything: Trump is the ultimate I-don’t-like-Obama guy. That’s what he ran on. I went to the White House with a bunch of Kanye’s friends—Pusha-T, A$AP Rocky—and Kanye wasn’t there. I think Obama fucked us all up by calling Kanye a jackass and not inviting him to the White House. These are the bad things about Obama’s legacy—his immigration policy, drone strikes, and calling Kanye a jackass.

TALIB KWELI: Thank you. Yeah. Word up. The comment from Talib Kweli regarding Black Star’s cancellation is factually incorrect. We wish him and Black Star the best as they continue their successful careers. TALIB KWELI: Yeah. I would say so.

ALI: I just – it was just – in hearing some of the pre-release stuff that they were working on, and I just was excited because I felt like you passing the flag to incredible artists who are going to take it in a completely different place than we had taken it, and were going to do beautiful, wonderful things with the art. And so it was just a on-the-sideline enthusiasm for like, “They’re the next,” and looking forward to support them however we could.

With Black Star, there was a breeze. Even the heaviest of topics and catalysts—the deaths of both Biggie and 2Pac—were given the zero-gravity treatment without allowing the important to become the aimless. Where there could be drone (Definition”), there is a sweet and simple song. Where there could be misguided attempts at empowering women (Brown Skin Lady”), there is plainspoken joy and excitement. Where there could be patronizing words of wisdom (Children’s Story”), there is an understated tenderness for all ages. Where backpack straps could have tightened, Mos Def and Talib Kweli brought a welcome ease to fastidious political philosophy. You’re welcome, Marcus Garvey.

ALI: – the upgraded version of that. And, well, culture’s seem to be more melded together. In New York, it always felt that way, for me at least. Different than going to Alabama and seeing the real separated lifestyle of people from different racial backgrounds.

Kweli: Yeah, certainly. My parents were professors, so there was a lot of academic influence in my household. When hip-hop became more conscious, which was considered the golden era of hip-hop from like ’87 to ’91, ’92 maybe, that was when I was in junior high school and the most impressionable. So the movement of hip-hop, which are Poor Righteous Teachers and your X-Clans, was coinciding with what I was learning in my house. Spike Lee — I went to Brooklyn Tech High School. Spike Lee had Spike’s Joint across the street. He was making a Malcolm X movie. You’d go into Spike’s Joint, it’d be all Malcolm X gear and stuff, so all that was coming together for me.

So I just was like a fly on the wall, watching this album, which is – it’s a brilliant album, by the way. It picks up where y’all left off. It’s futurist but it’s retro at the same time, and it’s like, man, I couldn’t believe my blessings. I just was like, “I must be doing something right in life to be in this moment.” And the idea that they would ask me to be on it. Oh my god.

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