the turning ending explained reddit – ‘The Turning’

When they interact with the others in the house, it’s believable. The Stranger Things actor is unable to find much to do with Miles, the seemingly psychotic teenage troublemaker who has been stripped of all color and shading.

the 4th turning review – The Turning Director Floria Sigismondi On Its Hidden Meaning

The TurningThe Turning seemed headed for doom for a while. This latest version of Henry James ‘ classic, oft-adapted novella The Turn of the Screw” gets a grunge makeover, radiating style and mood in the hands of director Floria Sigismondi The music video veteran—whose clips for Marilyn Manson ‘s The Beautiful People” and Justin Timberlake ‘s Mirrors” are just a couple of prime examples in her lengthy filmography—creates an unsettling vibe that’s quickly and deeply immersive. The James source material, which most notably has been adapted as 1961’s The Innocents ” starring Deborah Kerr , is straight-up Gothic horror. Its setting is a chilly, sprawling mansion where things go bump in the night, windows and doors slam shut on their own and whispers down dusty hallways eventually turn to screams.

Kinda feels like a washed out horror story. I expected something sinister and scary from a Francine Prose book but this one disappoints me. Some things weren’t explained properly and there are some loopholes in the story. The MC took a massive change of character which really confuses the fuck out me because in the previous chapter, he was okay, the next he was transformed into a dick.


Says RelishMix, The campaign for this thriller with horror elements was very straight forward and rather brief” (probably because the studio knew it was so bad). The first and only trailer from debuted in early October. The film has Stranger Things’ Finn Wolfhard, who was only activated in the last several days – and the non-social Mackenzie Davis.

Not terrible, but not great, and never hit that shivery note of dread that I look for in a good horror story. Frankly, I’d rather read Henry James – and I’m not sure I’ve ever put those words together in a sentence before. The film opens with Miss Jessel, the live-in tutor at the Fairchild Estate, fleeing the house in a panic. When she reaches the gate, she exits her car to open it and is attacked by a ragged looking man.

The scary images come faster and faster. Kate tries a second time to drive Flora away from the apparently haunted scene. The illusion, if it is an illusion, of the now departed previous teacher becomes increasingly corporeal.

This brief tangent even gives rise to the film’s only truly worthwhile horror sequence, in which a severed hand crawls all over a mortified Kate, a not-so-subtle but nonetheless clever enough metaphor for having unwanted human hands all over you. It’s a genuinely creepy sequence that works despite how poorly the hand itself is rendered.

A befuddling ending is hardly the only perplexing choice by the filmmakers of The Turning,” the latest update to the 19th-century horror novella The Turn of the Screw” by Henry James, a man we could say is now turning” in his grave — but we’ll spare you the pun.


Meanwhile, Henry James’ classic novel comes to life in “The Turning,” in which Mackenzie Davis plays a governess whose world suddenly comes crashing down in a mysterious estate in the Maine countryside. There is no saying the ghostly woman’s name to release Flora from her. Instead, the children seem to part company with Kate late in the film. This is different from the suggestion in the novel.

Later, without permission, Flora leaves the house while Miles is playing music for the governess. The governess notices Flora’s absence and goes with Mrs. Grose in search of her. They find her on the shore of a nearby lake, and the governess is convinced that Flora has been talking to the ghost of Miss Jessel. When the governess finally confronts Flora, the girl denies seeing Miss Jessel, but the governess forces the girl to say Miss Jessel’s name. That releases Miss Jessel’s power over the girl. However, Flora demands never to see the governess again. At the governess’s suggestion, Mrs. Grose takes Flora away to her uncle, leaving the governess with Miles, who that night at last talks to her about his expulsion. The ghost of Quint appears to the governess at the window. The governess shields Miles, who attempts to see the ghost. The governess tells Miles he is no longer controlled by the ghost, and then finds that Miles has died in her arms.The Turning

After reading a book, I’m not sure if this is a ghost story or a “hallucination” thingy book. Director Jan DeBont (“Twister”) reimagines Shirley Jackson‘s classic ghost story “The Haunting of Hill House” for a new generation. A young governess is hired by a man who has become responsible for his young nephew and niece after the deaths of their parents. A modern take on Henry James’ novella “The Turn of the Screw”.

The Turning” begins with elementary school teacher Kate (played by Mackenzie Davis, who made an impression in last year’s Terminator” movie). She explains to her roommate that she has accepted a job as the live-in teacher of Flora, a rich seven-year-old whose home is a Gothic mansion isolated on a huge wooded park.

Some time later, Kate Mandell is leaving her job as a teacher to become a governess for the seven year old Flora Fairchild after Miss Jessel’s disappearance. Before leaving she visits her mother, who suffers from delusions and lives in a mental institution. Upon arrival, she is informed by the caretaker Mrs. Grose that Flora witnessed her parents die in a car accident outside the houses gate and is a “special case.” Kate meets Flora who gives her a tour of the grounds, and confesses that she is afraid Kate will leave her without saying goodbye like Miss Jessel did, but Kate promises not to.

But once Kate arrives at the foreboding estate, she soon realizes she has more to deal with than her precocious charge, the sunny second-grader Flora ( The Florida Project ” star Brooklynn Prince ). She also must contend (and compete for authority) with the home’s longtime housekeeper, the angular and antagonistic Mrs. Grose ( Barbara Marten ). Soon, Flora’s arrogant teenage brother, Miles ( Finn Wolfhard of Stranger Things”), shows up unexpectedly from boarding school with some secrets of his own. And eventually, the legend of what happened to Flora’s previous teacher, as well as the riding instructor with whom Miles had forged a strong bond, comes into sharper focus.

Pretension rears its ugly head through two narrative detours that audiences traditionally hate: the old dream-within-a-dream trick, and an extended fantasy sequence that we realize is fantasy only after the fact – a nonsensical trek down a meaningless rabbit hole. As for the terrible ending, which is also rife with presentational pretension, it may be the most actively galling horror-movie finale in recent memory. It’s not just that the climax doesn’t give us closure; it actually feels like a good 15 or 20 minutes of movie got misplaced, and, unable to find them, Sigismondi opted instead to simply tack on the closing credits and call it a day. (The film’s action” continues over those credits, and because I was fool enough to remain in my seat ’til the bitter end, I can assure you that the final minutes do nothing to make the overall experience better, or even comprehensible.) Maybe The Turning doesn’t deserve its F,” but as I recall from school, a D-” wasn’t anything to celebrate.

Parents need to know that The Turning is a supernatural horror thriller based on Henry James’ 1898 gothic novella The Turn of the Screw. This adaptation stars Mackenzie Davis as a governess named Kate who’s tending to two mysteriously orphaned children ( Stranger Things ‘ Finn Wolfhard and The Florida Project ‘s Brooklynn Prince) at a massive Maine estate. Soon enough, the kids – and property – start to exhibit extremely strange, disturbing behavior, and Kate realizes something very sinister is at work. Expect lots of jump scares and super scary scenes and imagery; this may well be too much for kids who are easily spooked.

So many Stephen King adaptations have come out in the past few years, including Doctor Sleep , Pet Sematary , and Castle Rock Of all these stories, It might be King’s most iconic work, aside from maybe The Shining But when it comes to Finn Wolfhard movies, it’s hard to compete with an all-time classic killer clown caper.

If you like your stories to have a neat and tidy plot and ending, this is not the book for you. Many aspects of the story are unclear, including the motives of the ghosts and the children. It is possible that the governess is insane and there are no ghosts. Personally, I think this is a better ghost story because you are left to wonder. It is more chilling not to have things explained. My only quibble with the book is the writing. Even taking time period into account, the sentences are clunky and cumbersome. I was never able to get into the rhythm of James’ writing. For me, this lessened some of the suspense and creepiness of the book. Even so, I am glad I reread it.

The book ends with the governess forcing the little girl to say the name of her former teacher, which the governess believes releases the ghost’s hold on her. She attempts to “save” the brother in the same way, but he dies in her arms. And then the book ends! There’s never any indication whether the governess was right about any of it, whether there were ghosts at all, or if she was sane the whole time. Since its publication, James’ novella has become a standard text for exploring themes of female hysteria in horror – basically, the trope of the woman who seems to know exactly what kind of supernatural shenanigans are going on despite the fact that no one will listen to her. That The Turn of the Screw never outright says whether or not the main character is crazy is part of its appeal.

Richie was sort of arrogant, but endearingly, ribbing his friends. Miles is arrogant and entitled, creeping on Kate throughout the entire movie. When he’s not watching her sleep, he’s coughing up spiders. It’s a whole new degree of scary for Finn Wolfhard specifically.


For more than 100 years, a deeply haunting tale has been passed down to terrify audiences. DreamWorks Pictures’ The Turning takes us to a mysterious estate in the Maine countryside, where newly appointed nanny Kate is charged with the care of two disturbed orphans, Flora and Miles. Quickly though, she discovers that both the children and the house are harboring dark secrets and things may not be as they appear. Inspired by Henry James’ landmark novel, the haunted-house thriller is directed by renowned visualist Floria Sigismondi.

In the following interview with filmmaker Floria Sigismondi, she discusses adapting Henry James’ novella, setting her adaptation in the 1990s, and the meaning behind the film’s ambiguity. For the full interview, read below. No, not since the 1800s,” replies Kate (Mackenzie Davis), the teacher who has agreed to tutor the orphaned 7-year-old girl, Flora (Brooklynn Prince), who lives there.

Many of our patients appreciate being able to make same-day appointments. We get it – you don’t always know ahead of time when you will want acupuncture, and if you suddenly get a free hour, you might want to fill it with a treatment! But we also really hate to turn anybody away. So while we will try to accommodate walk-ins whenever possible, we ask that you please make an appointment, even if it’s only calling ahead to make sure there’s room in the schedule before you leave your house. If you show up without calling, you are taking the chance that we might be 100% booked for the rest of the day – it doesn’t happen often, but it does happen. If you walk in without an appointment, we need to treat the people who have appointments before we treat you, so you might have to wait a lot longer than we’d like.

Kate decides it’s time to leave Bly Manor (obviously) and goes to collect Flora, now with the ghost of Ms. Jessel. Miles is in his room playing music, and insists to Kate that the ghosts won’t let him leave. Kate’s suspicions, it seems, were correct: Miles is being controlled by Quint in some way. Kate convinces Miles to go — despite the ghost of Quint pitching a fit — and the three of them head out together in the car, away from the manor.

Categories Movies