Wilco Tickets, Tour Dates 2019 & Concerts Songkick

WilcoJeff Tweedy degli Uncle Tupelo , discepolo dichiarato di Gram Parsons , rompe con il socio Jay Farrar e vara il progetto Wilco. Superata l'”orgia” sperimentale di Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Wilco con A Ghost Is Born (Nonesuch, 2004) pubblicano il loro album più malinconico e introspettivo. Gli esperimenti, pur presenti (la lunga elucubrazione prog-rock di Spiders e la lunga coda alla Neil Young di Less Than You Think) appaiono qui fuori contesto e perfino condiscendenti (la loro lunghezza ingiustificata sembra quasi mirata a completare il disco). Le melodie più pop (Hummingbird, Muzzle of Bees) non sono altro che pop frivolo. Il resto è uniformemente in stile Wilco : ovvero un “deja-vu”.

Wilco continued their new musical trend with the next album which, although not as universally acclaimed as Yankee Hotel Foxtrot , was more than a worthy follow up. A Ghost Is Born presented a heavy dose of guitar noise and one song that droned on with background noise and subtle electronic clicks and buzzes for so long that it challenged the listener to keep their finger off the “Next” button. But it wasn’t all experimental and contained enough conventional rock and pop hooks to keep one’s interest.

I have a tough time picturing that happening. There are tens of thousands of artists that should be ahead of us that aren’t even in the discussion. In general, I think it’s jive, and I think it’s a money-making boondoggle for some people, and sort of a tax scam for the people of Cleveland. That’s how I feel about it.

The two records were like opposite sides of a coin: the first full of skronky asymmetrical power-pop that channeled the boundless possibility of childhood, the second a mellow meditation on bygone youth from the perspective of middle age. They were fine additions to the Wilco catalog, but to appreciate them, you had to get past the goofball presentation and actually listen.


Elsewhere on the record Ryley Walker covers Wilco’s newest track ‘Love Is Everywhere (Beware)’ , taken from the group’s forthcoming eleventh album ‘Ode to Joy’.

Rated 4 out of 5 by Stuartmcl from Excellent as ever A great set – played songs from across their 10 or so albums. Loved the new stuff too. In 2018, the frontman Jeff Tweedy released his second solo album, Warm”, which was met by critical acclaim and was followed by Warmer” in 2019.

TWEEDY: We’ve put things on records that aren’t comfortable to play. And we’ve either struggled to find a way to play them—because there’s some desire to conquer them, or a demand from an audience—or we’ve just left them behind, because it doesn’t fit the ensemble.

Sonically, Ode To Joy feels like an extension of recent albums like 2015’s Star Wars and 2016’s Schmilco, which dramatically stripped down the sumptuous, retro-rock arrangements of 2011’s The Whole Love (which itself was presented as a kind of comeback record) in favor of something scrappier, stranger, and more spare. Like its two predecessors, Ode To Joy’s most prominent elements are Jeff Tweedy’s world-weary vocals, which voice philosophical musings on the nature of mortality and the salvation of familial love, and the always brilliant percussion of Glenn Kotche. On Joy, Kotche often downshifts to a deliberate plod, giving the songs a pulse-like rhythm that underscores the introspective melancholy of Tweedy’s songs.

Jeff Tweedy’s Wilco expanded Uncle Tupelo’s vocabulary towards the Byrds’ folk-rock, Neil Young’s mournful ballads, the Rolling Stones’ drunk rhythm’n’blues, the Band’s domestic gospel-rock, Bob Dylan’s Blonde On Blonde and Big Star’s baroque pop on their second album, Being There (1996). Jay Bennett’s keyboards helped pen arrangements that left their roots way behind. Summer Teeth (1999), the natural evolution of that idea, was thus a studio product that relied heavily on electronic sounds, and Yankee Hotel Foxtrot (2002), their most experimental album, was a hodgepodge of eccentric arrangements and skewed melodies, a majestic nonsense that bridged the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds and Radiohead’s OK Computer.

Weariness sounds good on Jeff Tweedy. Much of the power and beauty across Wilco’s discography has resulted from their founder and frontman sounding beaten-down by life on Earth, reflecting back his listeners’ struggle to make sense of their own messy existence. Tweedy is better than most at crafting punchy pop songs and rousing rockers, but he unlocks some kind of special songwriting magic when he digs into his own pain and fatigue and peers out at the world through bleary eyes, bewildered but still clinging to hope. Stare back long enough and his ache becomes indistinguishable from your own.

Following his two solo albums, WARM and WARMER, and memoir, Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back), Tweedy gathered Wilco to The Loft in Chicago. While all six members of the band can be heard on every song, Tweedy and Glenn Kotche were the launching pad from which most of the songs on Ode to Joy materialized – Kotche’s percussion propels the music forward while Tweedy’s measured words flesh out the cleared paths. As a result, the album is comprised of really big, big folk songs, these monolithic, brutal structures that these delicate feelings are hung on,” as described by Tweedy. Across the entire album, drums pound and plod with a steady one-two pulse, meant to mimic the movement of marching—a powerful act utilized on both sides of the authoritarian wall. There’s also a sense of comfort that comes with the rhythmic marching sound.

For the receptive crowd, it is a spirit-raising ceremony of hardscrabble communion; Tweedy has a knack for writing songs that echo universal feelings of inadequacy and longing. The irony is that his band sound stronger than ever, emphasised by a climactic run-through of The Late Greats , a sly alt-country barnstormer that still sounds vital 15 years on. Here’s hoping we get another 15.

As a result, the album is comprised of really big, big folk songs, these monolithic, brutal structures that these delicate feelings are hung on,” as described by Tweedy. Across the entire album, drums pound and plod with a steady one-two pulse, meant to mimic the movement of marching—a powerful act utilized on both sides of the authoritarian wall. There’s also a sense of comfort that comes with the rhythmic marching sound.

Amazing show, as usual. As Tweedy admitted, possibly the best London gig they ever had. This time around, audience was somehow awake and actually took part into the show.

Retreating from the experimental orgy of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Wilco turned A Ghost Is Born (Nonesuch, 2004) into their most pensive, introspective, melancholy album. The experiments (the lengthy guitar-heavy prog-rock rumination of Spiders and the lengthy Neil Young-ian coda of Less Than You Think) sound out of context, and a bit indulgent (their length is unjustified, other than to fill the disc). The poppy tunes (Hummingbird, Muzzle of Bees) are just that: trivial pop. The rest is uniformly Wilco-esque, i.e. dejavu. The album was the band’s greatest commercial success, entering the top-1o charts.

TWEEDY: I’ve seen criticism where I get blamed for restraining you, or underutilizing your ability. And I don’t think that’s the case. You do so much of that expressive type of playing in your own work. Maybe I’m wrong, but I always felt like, after a while of being in the band, one of the things you really liked about coming to Wilco recordings was getting to play in a nuanced and textural way.

When you pre-order a copy of Ode to Joy from this store between July 16, 2019 and October 1, 2019, you will automatically become eligible to win prizes in a random drawing happening on each of the following Tuesdays at 3 PM, Central European Time: August 27, September 17 and October 1. Orders placed after 2:00 PM EST the day of the drawing will not be eligible to win until the following weekly drawing. Contestants can only win once. See here for full rules and restrictions.

After a two-year break – triggered by their drummer Glenn Kotche relocating to Finland so his wife could pursue a Fulbright scholarship – Wilco have returned with an imminent 11th album, the brazenly titled Ode to Joy, but the six-piece sound so fluid and relaxed it is as if they have never been away. During their furlough, Tweedy published a vivid and bracing memoir, Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back), and it perhaps feels as if he is done with small talk: with his curls tucked into a dark beanie hat, he limits his audience interactions to the odd wave and a cheery We’ve got a lot to get through!” during a crammed two-hour set.

Rated 4 out of 5 by DewiWyn from Definition of splendidness Is good, I go with friends, first time in concert of music, I fan Wilco. I want take Jeff Tweedy meet my family.

I had many reservations as this was my first time buying land. Miles Mc​L​aughlin and Tom Willis did a great job and thoroughly answered all my questions as best they could. Wilco appears to be an honest, knowledgeable, professional and trustworthy business that truly tries to do right by their customers. I would not have any issues with buying land from these guys again.

Jeff Tweedy further steered Wilco towards mainstream laid-back country-rock (with eerie 1970s overtones) on Sky Blue Sky (Nonesuch, 2007), despite the addition of jazz-rock guitar titan Nels Cline Nostalgic (Side With The Seeds), senile (On And On And On) and childish (What Light, the songs cannot shake the drowsiness that permeates them from the very beginning (Either Way). With the exception of Impossible Germany, Cline has rarely been so misused in his career.

Feist and Wilco performed “You and I” on Late Show with David Letterman on July 14, 2009. 110 In June during their West Coast tour, Wilco joined Beck , Feist, Jamie Lidell and James Gadson in the studio to take part in Beck’s Record Club project, covering Skip Spence ‘s Oar album. 111 The first song “Little Hands” was posted on Beck’s website on November 12, 2009.

Currently in the studio finishing LP3 with Jessica at the producer helm for the first time along with talented up-and-comer Andy D. Park (Pedro the Lion, Ruler) and mixing by Darrell Thorp (Radiohead, Beck, Paul McCartney) Jessica and band (comprised of husband Peter Mansen on drums, Garrett Gue on bass, and Elliot Jackson on guitar and synth) have together created a sound and experience that is colorful, energetic, and varied—with an emotional depth and pulsating charge that demands the listeners full attention. Sonically and emotively the album is massive and it will only be a matter of time until Jessica’s voice and talent are heard and given full attention by an ever increasing audience. Jessica has already been shining, but now it’s time to pay attention.

TWEEDY: Yeah, I think it has its toes in both worlds. But certainly the latter makes more sense with the way we put it together. We were getting back together after this long break we’d taken. Initially, my idea was that we’d spend six weeks together and hammer out the record from the ground up. But everybody’s so active all the time, outside the band, that those six weeks started getting chipped away at.Wilco

The group went on a break, while leader Jeff Tweedy released three solo albums in succession, with the last, Warmer, arriving less than six months before Wilco return for their 11th LP, Ode to Joy.

Wilco has been influenced by a wide variety of musical styles including folk, rock, country, punk and experimental music and each album they make seems to reflect its unique influences. The band formed in 1994 and released their debut album A.M.” just a year after their formation. A.M” is the band’s most alternative country sounding album to date and songs like Passenger Side” clearly convey the band’s influence of power pop bands like Big Star as well as country rock musicians like Neil Young and Gram Parsons.

TWEEDY: Everything across the board is better from my perspective, for a lot of different reasons. Wilco really only had one record as part of a buzz cycle, maybe two. I’ve always felt a little bit outside of whatever cool-kid moment there is. I don’t know if other people see it that way. But even Uncle Tupelo at the time wasn’t cool, compared to Dinosaur Jr. or something like that.


Il gruppo eccelle invece in quello che era il loro punto debole, il country tradizionale: Far Far Away, Forget the Flowers e Someday Soon regalano deliziose revisioni postmoderne (e un po’ parodistiche) del genere. Anche le melodie vaporosamente pop di Outta Mind e Why Would You Wanna Live, che nominalmente si rifanno a Raspberries e Big Star, sfoggiano questo piglio iconoclasta. Tweedy si concede persino il lusso di filastrocche stralunate e “lo-fi” come Red-Eyed and Blue. Tutta roba che non appartiene al suo (terribilmente serio) background. Sono gli arrangiamenti a fare la differenza, ad aggiungere quel pizzico di humour e di straniamento che trasformano una boriosa paternale in un aforisma eccentrico.

We’ve always tried to be engaged without being didactic or strident in our rhetoric. But in this era, there are a lot of oppressive things everyone is swimming around in. On the one hand, I don’t really want to give that much acknowledgement to oppressors. On the other hand, it would be inaccurate if what I’m working on did not reflect a certain state of mind and the exhaustion that comes with this constant, daily assault on reality. We’re all seeing what we’re seeing, and it needs to be apparent in the music we’re making.

Much of that has to do with production and arrangements that call back to the group’s studio-tinkering heyday. From the very first moments of opener Bright Leaves,” Glenn Kotche’s adventurous, shape-shifting drums are front and center in the mix, his cracking snare jolting life into songs that might have been insufferable dirges. Swaths of melody and noise build up and dissipate like passing weather patterns that occasionally become supernatural events. Ode To Joy mostly exists within the Bible-black predawn that fomented some of Tweedy’s finest slow-burn ballads; think Sunken Treasure” and In A Future Age” and Radio Cure” and Wishful Thinking” and the first Loose Fur LP.

Wilco toured extensively following the release of Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, and in 2003 began work on their next album, A Ghost Is Born. While sessions went smoothly compared to Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, after the album was finished Leroy Bach left the band in a split that was described as mutual and amicable; guitarist Nels Cline, keyboardist Mike Jorgensen, and multi-instrumentalist Pat Sansone joined Wilco for their subsequent tour. Shortly before the album’s release, Tweedy surprised many fans by announcing he had entered a drug rehabilitation facility to treat a dependency on painkillers, prescribed to treat a long history of migraine headaches aggravated by panic disorder. Tweedy discussed his health problems in depth, along with the often tangled history of Wilco and Uncle Tupelo, in Wilco: Learning How to Die, a biography of the group written by rock journalist Greg Kot, published to coincide with A Ghost Is Born’s release in the spring of 2004.


Yet there was never any doubt he’d return to Wilco, the shape-shifting rock group he’s led since 1994. Earlier this month, the Chicago band released Ode to Joy — its 11th album and its best work in ages — and hit the road for a tour that comes to Toyota Music Factory on Wednesday.

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Superata l'”orgia” sperimentale di Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, Wilco con A Ghost Is Born (Nonesuch, 2004) pubblicano il loro album più malinconico e introspettivo. Gli esperimenti, pur presenti (la lunga elucubrazione prog-rock di Spiders e la lunga coda alla Neil Young di Less Than You Think) appaiono qui fuori contesto e perfino condiscendenti (la loro lunghezza ingiustificata sembra quasi mirata a completare il disco). Le melodie più pop (Hummingbird, Muzzle of Bees) non sono altro che pop frivolo. Il resto è uniformemente in stile Wilco : ovvero un “deja-vu”.

Stylistically similar to Uncle Tupelo, the music on A.M. was considered to be straightforward alternative country rock in what Tweedy later described as “trying to tread some water with a perceived audience.” 15 A.M. peaked at number twenty-seven on the Billboard Heatseekers chart, considerably lower than the debut album of Jay Farrar’s new band, Son Volt 16 17 The album was met with modest reviews though it would rank thirty-fourth in the Village Voice ‘s 1995 Pazz & Jop critics poll. 18 19 20 Critically and commercially paling in comparison to the reception of Son Volt’s album, the Wilco members perceived A.M. to be a failure. 21 Shortly after the release of the album, multi-instrumentalist Jay Bennett joined the band, providing the band with a keyboardist and another guitarist.

I started getting nervous about whether we were going to have time, in just a couple of weeks, to get a record up off the ground. So I laid the groundwork with Glenn Kotche, drummer of Wilco. It was meant to just be the scaffolding, but it ended up being on the record. And then, when we all got together, we played together over those tracks. A lot of the overdubs were done in groups.

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