yaeji tour chicago – Yaeji (@kraeji)

We don’t really use sarcasm in the language, so it’s subdued but at the same time straightforward. Their whole catchphrase or whatever is This is a fantasy world where East and West coexist.” I’m playing it recently just to get the feel again.

yaeji tour uk – Yaeji Tracks & Releases On Beatport

YAEJIPeople who like Yaeji might also like these artists. The closer two names are, the greater the probability people will like both artists. Without a stable local social group, Yaeji turned, like so many of her generation, to the Internet. It comes at no surprise that this led to one of her first encounters with music.

A year later, Yaeji and I were both performing in the Serpentine Galleries’ Park Nights programme in London. The genuine warmth I felt from her and her crew was affirmed when my collaborator, Shy One and I, were invited to New York to open for the last leg of her One More tour. There, the familiar feeling began to make sense. In Yaeji, I recognized an artist who has made a conscious effort to surround herself with a community that values and sees her as much as she sees them.

You can trace that value throughout the producer’s life. An only child born in Queens, Yaeji moved around frequently during her childhood, first around New York City, then to Atlanta, and then back to Seoul. She attributes this move back to South Korea in part to her parents’ concern that she was speaking more and more in English, becoming less Korean. In Seoul she switched between different international schools on an almost yearly basis. As a result, it was often difficult for Yaeji to settle in to any kind of community. It’s really hard to make friends,” she reflects, as if the thought has only just occurred to her.

Yaeji’s music is an invitation into an intimate, healing, world exploring cultural identity and self-reflection through dreamlike house productions that morph from whispery confessionals to dancefloor burners.

Just seeing the crowd, and so many people that can actually speak and understand Korean, or are Korean — even the fact that these people look like me, and really get this, and fuck with me, was a whole other experience that was completely different from touring here or Europe. That was really special, and to show that to my team was really special.

YAEJI

New York-based Korean-American singer, producer and DJ Yaeji will be making her debut in Hong Kong this July. Known for her mixture of house and hip-hop style with her mellow vocals, Yaeji has successfully cultivated her own voice in the international dance scene. With hits such as Drink I’m Sippin On and Raingurl, be sure to catch some of her soft yet dynamic beats this summer.

Yeah! I started in Pittsburgh. At the end of my sophomore year of college, I joined the Carnegle Mellon University radio station WRCT 88.3 and met all these people into crazy music. I didn’t really grow up with music. A lot of it was being filtered. It hit me all at once. I was completely immersed. I skipped class and kept producing and DJing. All of this is so fresh to me – every show, every conversation. I learn so much. And opposite of you, I’m really interested in learning more about noise bands and punk. I want to go to these shows live. From what I gather, the energy is actually quite similar to techno raves. I love that connection between totally different sounding scenes. They are connected.

Last year, Pitchfork deemed Yaeji House Music’s Most Exciting New Voice for the way she oscillates between bass-heavy and more breathable moments, overlaid with her anxieties about her Korean-American identity, therapy, and skincare routines, taken from notes jotted down on the subway.

Now in Brooklyn, Yaeji has found a place, and an artistic community, where she finally fits. About a year ago, she started hosting weekly dinners for fellow musicians. Now she’s expanded the concept into full-blown shows, where heaped bowls of Japanese curry are dished up while she and her friends perform. Going to shows that are all night long, you’re dancing the whole time, so it’s fuel for you to keep going,” she says.

But that experience didn’t match the audiences’: they were too busy for stray thoughts, singing along (even if that meant butchering the Korean lines) while watching Yaeji throw herself around stage with dorky, singing-into-hairbrush abandon.

Thematically lots of things overlap. There’s a real sense of freedom. You can really be whoever you want to be in this game, everyone starts from zero. You can choose your race, gender, rank and either a merchant, fighter or an explorer. But what’s interesting is throughout the game you can change any of those by going on quests, which I thought was amazing! And I never thought about it as a child, but it was really ahead of its time.

Evidently Yaeji doesn’t believe in taking time off. Hot on the heels of her first Asian tour, the artist and DJ is throwing a rave in New York. The epic event titled Elancia” is Yaeji’s love letter to the parties, DJs, and friends” that have made New York feel like home. On September 6 at 592 Johnson Avenue, DJs from across the city including Soul Summit, Sublimate, Papi Juice, Hot ‘N Spicy, and School of Hard Trax will come together in Brooklyn. It’s almost like a reunion or something, without having been to the same school,” Yaeji laughs. We all know each other and I think some of the crews know each other. I think it’s exciting for us to all be in the same place.” i-D caught up with the artist at her studio, to learn how a Korean RPG inspired her to bring New York nightlife together.

Listening to Yaeji’s music is like having someone whisper in your ear in the middle of a crowded club. Combining deep, rumbling subs with the softest of vocals, it’s exhilarating and soothing at the same time. The combination wasn’t intentional. I was pretty shy about using my voice, because I don’t think of myself as an amazing singer,” the 24-year-old explains, speaking (softly) on the phone from Brooklyn. So me singing quietly came from that.” But what began as a by-product of her own self-doubt ended up perfectly suiting the duality of her music, which takes elements of house and techno and drapes gentle melodies over the top; the kind of songs, she says, that make you want to dance your soul out until sunrise”. She has got two EPs out – Yaeji and EP2 , both released this year – and has already landed a spot on the BBC Sound of 2018 longlist.

Across her 2016 debut and last year’s EP2, Yaeji’s stunning narrative glides from Korean to English, exploring her own identity, despotic beauty standards, jubilant love, and corrosive depression. Drink I’m Sippin’ On”, a remix of Drake’s Passionfruit”, and the mesmerising Raingurl” video are just some of the high notes from an embryonic career that’s garnered fans in Grimes and Charli XCX.

Yaeji’s music is an invitation into an intimate, healing world, exploring identity and self-reflection through dreamlike house productions that morph from whispery confessionals to dancefloor burners. Born in Queens to Korean parents and raised in both the U.S. and Seoul, Yaeji’s world is one that splits between cultures and knows no boundaries. She puts her genuine self in all that she touches; — in her productions in which she sings and raps in both Korean and English, in her high-energy, hybrid DJ sets, in her Curry in No Hurry events, her merch and beyond. Pulsing with irresistible charm and spirit, Yaeji’s 2017 debut self-titled EP and EP2 captivated listeners and critics alike, garnering praise from NPR, Vogue, The FADER, Pitchfork, Resident Advisor, Dazed and more. Yaeji’s latest One More ” was released in 2018 to critical acclaim, with TIME calling it sweet, whispery, enigmatic synth-pop” and V Magazine dubbing her the queen of subtle club jams.” Yaeji’s new project is forthcoming.

Back in Brooklyn, Yaeji partners with a Korean restaurant to serve curry at her regular gigs, trying to imbue some sense of community nourishment into the space. Neither Sydney show had curry, of course, but there was still that sense of intimacy there.

Some of these musician friends crop up in the video for her goofy, glitchy house track Raingurl. The video, which is lit like a Nicolas Winding Refn film, is an ode to Brooklyn’s underground rave scene. When the sweaty walls are banging,” she sings in her usual hushed tone as she dances in a transparent raincoat, I don’t fuck with family planning.” The song, she says, conveys my awkwardness, but at the same time it’s me not caring about what other people think, and not caring about my future.” All she’s thinking about, she says, is dancing really hard”.

Upon returning to America Yaeji began immersing herself in Brooklyn’s underground dance community, DJ’ing as a hobby in-between studying visual art and graphic design. It was while hitting up raves and house parties that ‘raingurl’ was born.

Ever one to bump members of her musical community, she name checks a few local institutions. Cakeshop, an iconic and influential club, and Contra, its new sister venue, both showcase artists and sounds on the cutting edge; Clique Records, according to Yaeji, is the record store for dance music in Seoul; and Seoul Community Radio, a platform for the burgeoning underground music community that offers great sounds from a wide range of genres. With strong roots in place, there are exciting possibilities on the horizon.



Yes. It’s tricky. It’s definitely affected my work and I want to say it’s positive because I think there’s less suppressive energy. I had a lot inside that I’m pulling out now – even anger. I’m angry about certain things that have happened to me because I’m a woman and I’m Asian but I struggle to be open with it. I’m bad at clearly vocalizing thoughts like Fuck men! Fuck this!” I feel like it’s not the right way for me to approach it. I’m more inclined to express something in an abstract way through music or visual art or starting conversations with my friends or making my friends feel loved. So I can’t put my finger on a specific way it’s changed my work but I think it has. Like you mentioned about yourself earlier, this whole DJ and electronic music scene is relatively new for me actually.

During her sophomore year, she joined Carnegie Mellon’s radio station WRCT (88.3 FM, for those of you who should ever find yourself in the Pittsburgh area). This might constitute the most pivotal moment in Yaeji’s musical career: WRCT introduced her to the electronic underground. While the scene in Pittsburgh isn’t exactly what you’d call thriving, Yaeji found a small, tight-knit community that enabled her to develop her taste and her talent, from early days of DJing on Ableton to eventually producing her own tracks.

Our last show in Asia was Seoul, in Korea. My whole family was there, my grandparents were sitting side stage with The Queens who were performing for a few songs, side by side. Really crazy worlds clashing, but also so harmonious at the same time. Just tears of joy, I could not stop crying at the end of the set because I was so happy, and I was talking to everyone in Korean, and I’ve never got to do that. That was mind blowing. Like Wow I can talk to you in this language I talk and dream and sing in sometimes.” This is a side of me I don’t get to let out as much, only in my music, and that happens in a studio and I’m alone. And otherwise with family when I’m on the phone. I feel really happy right now coming back from that experience.

Bjork! I would love to brainstorm together and create an imaginary creature(critter) with her. When I see her work and listen to her music I feel like I can believe in anything! And that anything can be beautiful.

In 5 years, I want to continue music, visual art, directing, collaborating. I want to dig deeper into music engineering, produce for other musicians, share my knowledge, create more opportunities for people in the underground scene. In 10 years, maybe I’ll have my own label. I hope to have created a platform where I can share talent by those who I believe in that are unrecognized. And to run programs for teaching marginalized kids how to make music and DJ.

The 25-year-old put the up-tempo music on hold for her soulful rendition of Drake’s Passionfruit, which helped her rise to fame in 2017. During this, the audience stopped their dance moves and instead raised their phones to film her stunning acoustics.

Check out the music video for Yaeji’s ‘Raingurl’ below. N—Taking off my pants haha. Also time, working out, taking more risks, watching Sopranos, realizing it’s OK to feel bad for a while and a lot of sad classical piano playing.

The NYC-based producer, rapper, singer, and DJ, Yaeji splashed onto the music radar in 2017 with her dreamy, melancholic rendition of Drake’s Passionfruit” and has since garnered the attention of major media outlets and countless listeners. Born Kathy Yaeji” Lee, the Korean-American artist masterfully sculpts her signature sound by integrating her gritty, underground electronic roots with a hush yet angular voice. Yaeji’s latest project, EP2 highlights the dance music prodigy’s versatility as she floats between the English and Korean language over a bed of house, trap, and pop-inspired beats. The sophomore EP has successfully amassed well over 10 million plays across Spotify and YouTube and shows no signs of slowing down. With so much promise, Yaeji carries the momentum into 2018 with her Make It Rain North America Tour and nods from both Coachella and Panorama NYC.

The closer two names are, the greater the probability people will like both artists. Without a stable local social group, Yaeji turned, like so many of her generation, to the Internet. It comes at no surprise that this led to one of her first encounters with music.


ADER error is an anonymous South Korean design collective. I wouldn’t even have known where they were from, except that I first discovered them in a Korean indie magazine. Their gender-ambiguous garments and simple yet prominent graphics are forward-thinking compared to what I was used to seeing growing up in Seoul.

You can trace that value throughout the producer’s life. An only child born in Queens, Yaeji moved around frequently during her childhood, first around New York City, then to Atlanta, and then back to Seoul. She attributes this move back to South Korea in part to her parents’ concern that she was speaking more and more in English, becoming less Korean. In Seoul she switched between different international schools on an almost yearly basis. As a result, it was often difficult for Yaeji to settle in to any kind of community. It’s really hard to make friends,” she reflects, as if the thought has only just occurred to her.

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