Zombieland: Double Tap – Lakewood Cinema 8

It doesn’t have much on its mind, but it isn’t completely brain-dead either. Looking for movie tickets? Right away, Double Tap underwhelms by recycling some of its predecessor’s key beats. Woody Harrelson as Tallahassee, Columbus’ trusted partner.

zombieland double tap – City Cinemas 8

Zombieland: Double TapA decade after ZOMBIELAND became a hit film and a cult classic, the lead cast (Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg, Abigail Breslin, and Emma Stone) have reunited with director Ruben Fleischer (Venom) and the original writers Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick (Deadpool) for ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP. Nearly all the first movie’s central surviving cast returns, including Eisenberg’s neurotic, rule-bound Columbus, Emma Stone’s cool-eyed Wichita, her restless baby sister Little Rock (a now-grown Abigail Breslin), and Tallahassee, played with whooping redneck bliss by Woody Harrelson , perhaps the only man actually getting off on the apocalypse.

Though they continue to struggle for survival, the group’s grim situation does have its advantages. Thus early scenes find them taking up residence in the abandoned White House and Columbus proposing to Wichita using the Hope Diamond.

Columbus once again explains the milieu and the characters’ daily existence with wall-to-wall narration, often spelling out to us what we can obviously surmise or see for ourselves. His rules for survival pop up in text on screen—cardio, never trust bathrooms, enjoy the little things in life, etc.—but the device quickly grows tiresome. So do his frequent reminders that he knows we’re watching him and his friends in a movie, with jokes about putting down your Milk Duds or experiencing Zombieland Double Tap” in 4DX.

At the beginning of the movie, the quartet holes up in the White House, rummaging through presidential mementos. In their quasi-familial tension, Double Tap comes across an interesting idea: because these characters must stick together in a world overrun by zombies, their social structures have been rearranged. Little Rock has no access to friends her own age. And for that matter, neither does Tallahassee, who instead treats his surrogate daughter as both a little girl and a faithful zombie-killing sidekick. (His gifts for her are guns, always guns.) Meanwhile, Wichita finds it hard to achieve domestic bliss with Columbus when they have to cling to domesticity in order to survive.

On the road, the group tries to commandeer a luxury RV since Columbus has a strict “no clown” policy that prevents them from getting in an ice-cream truck. As they enter the RV, the alarm goes off causing zombies to attack. Methodically fighting back as a team, they encounter one of the super-zombies that takes multiple gunshots to kill, leading Columbus to nickname it the ” T-800 ” after the Terminator franchise. Madison shows signs of “zombification”, forcing Columbus to lead her into the forest to shoot her. The group finds “the Beast”, Tallahassee’s modified presidential limousine which was stolen by Little Rock, at an Elvis -themed motel run by Nevada , who reveals Little Rock took another vehicle toward Babylon, a hippie commune. Bonding over their love of Elvis, Nevada and Tallahassee spend the night together.


A decade after Zombieland became a hit film and a cult classic, the lead cast (Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg, Abigail Breslin, and Emma Stone) have reunited for Zombieland: Double Tap. In the sequel where the comic mayhem stretches from the White House and through the heartland, these four slayers must face off against the many new kinds of zombies that have evolved since the first movie, as well as some new human survivors. But most of all, they have to face the growing pains of their own snarky, makeshift family.

As an avid fan of the original Zombieland,” I was highly anticipating the release of Zombieland: Double Tap.” Because of the first movie’s charm, its satire on the zombie genre, its simple but poignant plot and most importantly, its funny jokes, one would think that its sequel would at least share some of those qualities, if not all. Well, I’m sorry to say — it doesn’t.

If you’ve seen Double Tap, you may already agree with the popular consensus that while the film is largely enjoyable, it falls slightly short of perfect. As with the first Zombieland, there are plenty of things to love about the sequel, but there are also a few things that didn’t work as well as we might have hoped. Below, we sink our teeth into the five best and five worst things about Zombieland: Double Tap. Beware, for here there be zombie-sized spoilers.


You can accuse Zombieland: Double Tap of a lot of things, but being a rushed sequel isn’t one of them. Ten years (!) passed before they finally got everyone back together for a followup, which allowed for different story ideas than they could have used in 2011 or whenever Sony was probably originally planning to continue the franchise. Abigail Breslin’s Little Rock, for example, spends the movie hoping to get high and find a boyfriend, which would have been kind of gross if they immediately went back to “Z-world” when she was only 14. Luckily, the first film’s fans were happy to spend another 90 minutes with the quartet of heroes, and despite the lengthy delay, Double Tap ended up grossing an almost identical amount to the first film in the US, an impressive feat considering how much of a shrug most non Marvel sequels have been greeted with as of late.

So we’re left with a sequel that looks superficially correct — there’s Wichita with her leather jackets, and Tallahassee with his cowboy hats, and Columbus with those big blocky captions spelling out his rules — but feels totally empty. The characters we used to enjoy have become paper doll versions of themselves, pushed around by an aimless plot for 99 minutes until it’s time to go home.

The original Zombieland” was released in theaters 10 years ago, becoming a major hit for the living-dead genre. It wasn’t the first movie to wring laughs out of a viral apocalypse, but it brought a more sitcom-like sensibility to the formula, with big, eccentric characters and killer one-liners alongside the kills.

We’re willing to suspend a lot of disbelief for the Zombieland movies, but in a film that’s supposed to be set a decade into a zombie apocalypse, there are a few things that are a little hard to swallow. We can accept Columbus’ explanation that the reason why every building the characters enter still has electricity is because of rainwater continually filling the dams at hydroelectric power plants, but there’s still quite a bit that rainwater and dams can’t explain. In the first film, most of our issues could be handwaved away because of the time period — the zombie apocalypse had only been going on for a short time, so of course the characters would have a relatively easy time finding food, clothing, fuel, clean water, and other resources.

Columbus, Tallahassee, Wichita, and Little Rock stay on the move as they continue to battle the undead, now in a new and improved evolved zombie! But sometimes, the living are even more dangerous as they encounter fellow survivors and some new rules.Zombieland: Double Tap

Every movie sequel is inevitably beholden to certain elements of its first film, but Zombieland: Double Tap” cribs so liberally from the original that it robs the entire outing of any narrative tension whatsoever (and this is a franchise built around the fear of increasingly unpredictable brain-biting monsters, basically a cinematic tension delivery service). From the fissures that appear between the various characters to the key locations that inspire road trip adventuring, it’s all been done before, with all the same people. Even the dum-dum decision that ultimately draws the baddies to the group’s long-sought place of apparent refuge is taken straight from its predecessor’s playbook.


Columbus, Wichita, and Madison in Zombieland: Double Tap. It’s all a bit unnerving. And, hey, flat-out scary at times. But that’s the new reality that Columbus and his makeshift family are facing together. Abigail Breslin as Little Rock, Wichita’s rebellious younger sister.

Though Columbus would like to reconcile with Wichita, there’s a complicating factor in the person of ditzy blonde Madison (Zoey Deutch) with whom Columbus has struck up a casually physical relationship. Madison’s bubbly personality also grates on Tallahassee so her decision to join the trio on their quest makes for a comically uncomfortable expedition.

Zombie slayers Tallahassee, Columbus, Wichita and Little Rock leave the confines of the White House to travel to Graceland in Memphis, Tenn. Along the way, they encounter other post-apocalyptic warriors and a group of survivors who find refuge in a commune. The scrappy fighters must now rely on their wits and weapons more than ever as they soon find themselves in a relentless battle against smarter, faster and seemingly indestructible zombies.

For some audiences, that may be enough to get their fix: Zombieland: Double Tap” still finds space for big laughs (the pairing of Eisenberg and Harrelson remains nutty and fun), a welcome cameo in the credits, and a banger of a final battle in which the body count soars to ridiculous numbers. But, after 10 years of anticipation, it would have been nice to see a zombie movie with more on its mind than the same goofy undead routine.

Synopsis: A decade after Zombieland became a hit film and a cult classic, the lead cast (Woody Harrelson, Jesse Eisenberg, Abigail Breslin, and Emma Stone) have reunited with director Ruben Fleischer (Venom) and the original writers Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick (Deadpool) for Zombieland: Double Tap. In the sequel, written by Rhett Reese & Paul Wernick and Dave Callaham, through comic mayhem that stretches from the White House and through the heartland, these four slayers must face off against the many new kinds of zombies that have evolved since the first movie, as well as some new human survivors. But most of all, they have to face the growing pains of their own snarky, makeshift family.

Through comic mayhem that stretches from the White House and through the heartland, the Zombie slayers must face off against many new kinds of zombies that have evolved since the first movie, as well as some new human survivors. But most of all, they have to face the growing pains of their own snarky, makeshift family.

Still, Zombieland made waves for its clever and very gory spin on the zombie apocalypse genre that didn’t take itself too seriously. It featured an uncommonly good cast: Woody Harrelson, who’d won an Emmy for Cheers in 1987; Abigail Breslin, who’d been nominated for an Oscar for Little Miss Sunshine in 2007; and Jesse Eisenberg and Emma Stone, who’ve racked up multiple Oscar nominations between them in the years since (Eisenberg for The Social Network in 2011; Stone for Birdman in 2015, La La Land in 2017, and The Favourite in 2019).

The main characters are Wichita, Tallahassee, Little Rock and Columbus. Unfortunately, there is no online co-op so you must have 4 controllers to get this one. The first mission, Learn Your Rules, is the shortest level and can be handled solo. Log in with a guest account on the second, third and fouth controllers. Now, move them up until Rule #7: Travel Light, and let the zombies down them after that. DO NOT REVIVE THEM. Finish the level on your own.

As before, a trip through Zombieland entails lots of set piece detours. One of Double Tap’s best sustained sequences starts with an insultingly blatant rip-off of a memorable throwaway gag from Shaun of the Dead. Director Ruben Fleischer and the writers elaborate on this theft, then play it straight into an impressively choreographed single-take (or, more likely, simulated single-take) slapstick zombie fight, with Eisenberg, Stone, Harrelson, and newcomer Rosario Dawson shooting and dodging through multiple rooms of a garishly decorated Elvis-themed motel.

Tallahassee, the senior zombie-killer played by Woody Harrelson in Zombieland: Double Tap,” has a catchphrase that’s a little too naughty for me to quote. You’ve probably heard it before, and you might agree with another character’s assessment: That saying is very 2009.” The whole movie is very 2009, which is amusing and puzzling and possibly kind of a relief, given what very 2019” might look like.

Or, the movie then counter-suggests, maybe they should just show up to crack some cheap jokes and fight another horde of super-zombies. At times, Double Tap does recapture the original film’s tossed-off delights. It’s been revived with so many of the original actors and filmmakers for that express purpose. But this particular sequel suggests that in another 10 years, there won’t be much left to reanimate.

Columbus also introduces us to Zombie Kill of the Year awards. These are incredibly messy showcased kills that pulverize or annihilate zombies in flashy, dynamic ways. For instance, someone chases zombies down and grinds them up with a huge hay baler that spews out blood-soaked bales with faces and body parts mixed in.

After 10 years, Woody Harrelson, Emma Stone, Jesse Eisenberg and Abigail Breslin are still murdering the pop-culture clichés. The vast majority of sequels are unnecessary, but Zombieland: Double Tap” feels particularly so, especially coming out a decade after the original.

Fantasy-tinged stories like Zombieland” always require a certain suspension of disbelief, but the film’s script doesn’t just stretch logic; it snaps it. Screenwriters Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick have apparently been dreaming of a followup for years, which makes the sloppy elements sting all the more. In the film’s first act, the group decamps for the White House, giddy over the possibility of exploiting stronger security measures. They waltz right in the unlocked front door. Later, a character who owns a hotel for people eager to escape the madness of the z’s” greets her human clients with a shotgun. Soon enough, they’ve decamped for an idyllic location that has never once been previously mentioned (nor has its location been disclosed), arriving at the secretive spot within mere hours. It’s almost too easy and deprives the movie of any discernible sense of danger. These are small moments, but they add up to something as brain-free as the film’s own walking dead.

The scrappy squad is still vanquishing the undead, and following Columbus’ strict set of rules to try to survive in what looks like a modern-day Dust Bowl. This time, they choose a pretty lofty place for shelter: the White House. That’s where the movie’s best gags happen.

Now, a decade later, despite the fact that the entire cast has moved onto bigger and better things (Stone has since become one of the A-List actresses in Hollywood), the gang is getting back together what is sure to be a hilarious sequel.

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